Freedom's a-Callin Me by Ntozake Shange

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Synopsis

Award-winning poet Ntozake Shange and artist Rod Brown reimagine the journeys of the brave men and women who made their way to freedom on the Underground Railroad.

Fleeing on the Underground Railroad meant walking long distances; swimming across streams; hiding in abandoned shanties, swamps, and ditches, always on the run from slave trackers and their dogs.

ah might get hungry
ah may get tired
good Lawd /
ah may be free

The Underground Railroad operated on secrecy and trust. But who could be trusted?

There were free black and white men and women helping, risking their lives, too. Because freedom was worth any risk. Celebrated collaborators Ntozake Shange and Rod Brown pay tribute to the Underground Railroad, a universal story about the human need to be free.

ah am a livin bein’ & ah got to be free

 

About Ntozake Shange

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Ntozake Shange is a celebrated poet and the author of the Obie Award-winning play and film For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When the Rainbow Is Enuf. Her children's books include We Troubled the Waters, Coretta Scott, and Ellington Was Not a Street. She lives in Oakland, CA.
 
Published January 3, 2012 by Amistad. 32 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Freedom's a-Callin Me

Kirkus Reviews

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In a stirring picture book for older readers, Lester (Sam and the Tigers, 1996, etc.) creates meditations on the journey of Africans to slavery, on the lives of people held as slaves, and on runaways, the Civil War, and the meaning of freedom.

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Kirkus Reviews

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In the title poem, the man says “ah may get tired / good Lawd / ah may may be free.” Inspirational pairings of art and verse to read and recite in tribute to those who walked that perilous road.

Dec 20 2011 | Read Full Review of Freedom's a-Callin Me

Publishers Weekly

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his words are raw and agonized in some places (“ah jus’ can’t take it no more,” he says, “ah am not some animal to be worked from dawn to dusk/ livin on the entrails of hogs & such”) and unbearably poignant in others (“but he’s travelin alone,” he protests to another escapee abo...

Nov 28 2011 | Read Full Review of Freedom's a-Callin Me

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