From the Ashes of Sobibor by Thomas Toivi Blatt
A Story of Survival (Jewish Lives)

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 2 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

When the Germans invaded Poland on September 1, 1939, Thomas Toivi Blatt was twelve years old. He and his family lived in the largely Jewish town of Izbica in the Lublin district of Poland - a district that was to become the site of three of the six major Nazi extermination camps: Belzec, Sobibor, and Majdanek. Blatt's account of his childhood in Izbica provides a fascinating glimpse of Jewish life in Poland after the German invasion and during the periods of mass deportations of Jews to the camps. Blatt tells of the chilling events that led to his deportation to Sobibor, of his separation from his family, and of the six months he spent at Sobibor before taking part in the most successful uprising and mass breakout in any Nazi camp during World War II. Blatt's tale of escape, and of the five horrifying years spent eluding both the Nazis and later anti-Semitic Polish nationalists, is a firsthand account of one of the most terrifying and savage events of human history. From the Ashes of Sobibor also includes a moving interview with Karl Frenzel, a Nazi commandant from Sobibor.
 

About Thomas Toivi Blatt

See more books from this Author
Thomas (Toivi) Blatt is a survivor of Sobibor, the infamous Nazi death camp, where he took part in the most daring and successful revolt and escape from any Nazi camp during World War II. The story of the revolt was retold in the award-winning CBS film, Escape from Sobibor, a Chrysler Corporation Special in 1987.
 
Published June 25, 1997 by Northwestern University Press. 242 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Travel, War, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for From the Ashes of Sobibor

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

In 1958, when Blatt emigrated to Israel, he sent the story of his incarceration and escape from Sobibor to a notable Auschwitz survivor. The names Auschwitz, Treblinka and Dachau had by then become sy

Jan 04 1999 | Read Full Review of From the Ashes of Sobibor: A ...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

In 1958, when Blatt emigrated to Israel, he sent the story of his incarceration and escape from Sobibor to a notable Auschwitz survivor.

| Read Full Review of From the Ashes of Sobibor: A ...

Reader Rating for From the Ashes of Sobibor
95%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 10 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×