Gandhi by Rajmohan Gandhi
The Man, His People, and the Empire (Philip E. Lilienthal Book in Asian Studies)

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Synopsis

This monumental biography of one of the most intriguing figures of the twentieth century, written by his grandson, is the first to give a complete and balanced account of Mahatma Gandhi's remarkable life, the development of his beliefs and his political campaigns, and his complex relations with his family. Written with unprecedented insight and access to family archives, it reveals a life of contrasts and contradictions: the westernized Inner Temple lawyer who wore the clothes of India's poorest and who spun cotton by hand, the apostle of nonviolence who urged Indians to enlist in the First World War, the champion of Indian independence who never hated the British. It tells of Gandhi's campaigns against racial discrimination in South Africa and untouchability in India, tracks the momentous battle for India's freedom, explores the evolution of Gandhi's strategies of non-violent resistance, and examines relations between Muslims and non-Muslims, a question that attracted Gandhi's passionate attention and one that persists around the world today. Published to rave reviews in India in 2007, this riveting book gives North American readers the true Gandhi, the man as well as the legend, for the first time.
 

About Rajmohan Gandhi

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Rajmohan Gandhi is Research Professor at the Center for South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. A former member of the Rajya Sabha (the upper house of the Indian Parliament), he led the Indian delegation to the UN Human Rights Commission in 1990. His other books include Ghaffar Khan: Nonviolent Badshah of the Pakhtuns, Revenge & Reconciliation: Understanding South Asian History, and Eight Lives: A Study of the Hindu-Muslim Encounter.
 
Published January 1, 2007 by Haus Pub.. 700 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Political & Social Sciences, Travel. Non-fiction

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Publishers Weekly

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The author, Professor Gandhi of the Univ. of Ill., was 12 years old when his grandfather was assassinated by a Hindu extremist. Besides being the global symbol of nonviolent resistance, Mohandas Gandh

Feb 04 2008 | Read Full Review of Gandhi: The Man, His People, ...

Los Angeles Times

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Gandhi was in charge of the stretcher-bearers who served at the fighting front at the same time that a young Winston Churchill was reporting on the war as a newspaper correspondent: "Gandhi and Churchill were seldom again on the same side," observes the author.

Apr 13 2011 | Read Full Review of Gandhi: The Man, His People, ...

London Review of Books

Forgotten Wars: The End of Britain’s Asian Empire by Christopher Bayly and Tim Harper (Allen Lane, 704 pp., January 2007, 978 0 7139 9782 8)His Majesty’s Opponent: Subhas Chandra Bose and India’s Struggle against Empire by Sugata Bose (Harvard, 412 pp., £25.95, May 2011, 978 0 674 04754 9)Gandhi ...

Jul 05 2012 | Read Full Review of Gandhi: The Man, His People, ...

DNA

The difference that would ultimately irreparably damage the relationship was glimpsed in that maiden encounter: Jinnah welcomed Gandhi in fluent English and Gandhi responded in chaste Gujarati.

Oct 07 2012 | Read Full Review of Gandhi: The Man, His People, ...

The New York Review of Books

In the first part of my book, Gandhi’s Truth, I describe the way in which, on a trip to India, my “psycho-historical” interest was aroused by what some surviving witnesses told me about a relatively little known event of Gandhi’s middle years, namely his leadership, in 1918, of a textile strike i...

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The New York Review of Books

Instead of staying in the capital for the victory celebrations set to take place in August 1947, Gandhi left for Calcutta, leaving it to Nehru to unfurl the national flag at the Red Fort and give his famous speech about a “Tryst with Destiny,” saying that the joyful cries of “Jai Hind!“—Glory to ...

Apr 28 2011 | Read Full Review of Gandhi: The Man, His People, ...

Spirituality & Practice

It provides a moral basis to all other activities which they would otherwise lack, reducing life to a maze of 'sound and fury signifying nothing.' " In another passage, Gandhi expresses his belief in the truth of all religions.

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Spirituality & Practice

But the myth of redemptive violence prevails all over the world despite the success of four nonviolent revolutions based on Gandhi's principles: the civil rights movement in the United States under Dr. Martin Luther King, the changes made in South Africa under the leadership of Desmond Tutu and N...

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Spirituality & Practice

Easwaran writes: "Gandhi used to put the matter bluntly: when another person's welfare means more to you than your own, only then can you say you love.

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The Express Tribune

When another book on Gandhi’s life comes to stores, one can’t help wondering what new insight the writer could possibly come up with.

Jul 03 2011 | Read Full Review of Gandhi: The Man, His People, ...

OpEdNews

The basic premise of Finkelstein's book is that " The real Gandhi did loathe violence but he loathed .

Jul 10 2012 | Read Full Review of Gandhi: The Man, His People, ...

India Today

Gandhi, a great-grandson of Mohandas, has come up with a tediously lengthy chronicle of the conspiracy to "murder" the Mahatma (why the expression assassination is not used is far from clear) and the subsequent investigations and trials.

Mar 26 2007 | Read Full Review of Gandhi: The Man, His People, ...

The Times of India

When reviews of Pulitzer prize winner Joseph Lelyveld's "Great Soul: Mahatma Gandhi and His Struggle with India" hit the newspapers in England and US claiming that the book says Gandhi was a bisexual and had a German-Jewish bodybuilder lover in Hermann Kallenbach it created immediate sensation.

Mar 29 2011 | Read Full Review of Gandhi: The Man, His People, ...

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