Garbo by Barry Paris
A Biography

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Synopsis

The author of Louise Brooks presents a full-scale portrait of the legendary and enigmatic actress, drawing on previously unavailable source material to provide a revealing look at her life, career, and personal relationships. 20,000 first printing. Movie/Entertainment Alt.
 

About Barry Paris

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Paris is a Russian scholar and has translated the plays of Chekhov.
 
Published February 21, 1995 by Knopf. 654 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Humor & Entertainment. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Garbo

Kirkus Reviews

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Paris tellingly repeats Cecil Beaton's observation that ``if she hadn't been `Garbo,' nobody would've wanted to be around her for ten minutes.'' Paris had access to 100 hours of recorded phone conversations between Garbo and art dealer and confidant Sam Green from the 1970s and '80s that portray ...

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The New York Times

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Henry Daniell sneers stylishly as the wealthy, worldy Baron de Varville, and Lionel Barrymore, as Armand's doting father, resembles Lionel Barrymore.

Nov 01 1987 | Read Full Review of Garbo: A Biography

Publishers Weekly

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Garbo found a substitute family in the home of her closest friend, actress Salka Viertel, and this revealing biography, featuring 180 photographs woven into the narrative, draws on the 50-year Garbo-Viertel correspondence, on firsthand reminiscences and on Garbo's taped conversations with her con...

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Entertainment Weekly

Garbo: A Biography Barry Paris (Knopf, $35) Hollywood's greatest star was its greatest anomaly-a spellbinding actress who could live without acting, a sex symbol who could live without sex, a frosty, unapproachable Nordic island in a tropical sea of publicity.

Mar 17 1995 | Read Full Review of Garbo: A Biography

The Telegraph

The first time Greta Garbo delivered her most celebrated line was in Grand Hotel (1932): “I want to be alone… I just want to be alone.” It struck a chord, and was repeated with variations in a number of her subsequent films – in Ninotchka (1939), for example, one of the Soviet envoys ...

Aug 06 2012 | Read Full Review of Garbo: A Biography

PopMatters

Garbo’s eccentricities, on the other hand, were lauded and her career not only flourished, she quickly became MGM’s greatest asset even with the advent of “Talkies”—which killed the career of many a famous silent film star (Emil Jannings or Mary Pickford, anyone?) This despite the fact that the d...

Dec 11 2002 | Read Full Review of Garbo: A Biography

Time Out New York

And although the play wants to argue for the virtues of subtlety as opposed to hollow glamour (Schwartz's Canaris is a noble martyr, while Philby litters the stage with flasks), Kevin Cunningham's flashy staging tells a different story.

Mar 14 2011 | Read Full Review of Garbo: A Biography

Time Out New York

Then the film spectacularly rights itself for a poetic final act that details Garbo's early-'80s reemergence: Roch pairs video of the now-aged operative wandering through a series of congratulatory fetes with oddball music choices like Sparklehorse's "It's a Wonderful Life."

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Slant Magazine

Intellectuals from Roland Barthes to Kenneth Tynan have rhapsodized idiotically and sometimes touchingly about the Greta Garbo phenomenon.

Sep 07 2005 | Read Full Review of Garbo: A Biography

The Paris Review

Inside, while she got a cart and started making her rounds, I hung back at the newsstand, in my Catholic school uniform, and tore photos of boy heartthrobs from glossy teen magazines and then stuffed them into the waistband of my blue plaid skirt.

Oct 27 2011 | Read Full Review of Garbo: A Biography

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