Gary Soto by Gary Soto
New and Selected Poems

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Synopsis

A collection of poems describing the experiences of Mexican Americans in California.
 

About Gary Soto

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Gary Soto is one of today's most celebrated Chicano writers. He has received the Literature Award from the Hispanic Heritage Foundation, and his New & Selected Poems was a finalist for the National Book Award. He lives in Berkeley, California.
 
Published March 1, 1995 by Chronicle Books. 192 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Gary Soto

Kirkus Reviews

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An inexperienced middle-school honor student’s eye-opening visit to a liberal-arts college starts the collection, and a far less naïve young girl has an equally revealing visit to a friend’s house in the 13th and final tale.

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Ten perceptive short stories give glimpses of everyday life and emotions among a variety of adolescent Latinos.

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Publishers Weekly

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The first half of this wry, meditative collection brings us through Soto's boyhood and teenage years and his tentatively evolving spiritual and sensual awareness.

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Publishers Weekly

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Once again, the author of Taking Sides and Pacific Crossing creates a vibrant tapestry of Chicano American neighborhoods in this newest collection of stories highlighting small yet significant moments in the lives of 13 adolescents.

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Publishers Weekly

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Rudy's relatives offer plenty of advice on how to make small talk and his father stresses that Rudy be proud of his heritage and his family--no matter what.

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Publishers Weekly

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Soto (Too Many Tamales) commands a poet's gift for defining characters quickly, densely and, in this case, with hilariously choice words.

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Soto is one of our most accomplished Mexican-American poets under the age of 45. In this collection, poems from six of his previous 13 books (The Tale of Sunlight; Home Course in Religion) and a sampl

Feb 27 1995 | Read Full Review of Gary Soto: New and Selected P...

Publishers Weekly

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In addition to this romance, Soto concocts an ingenious way of introducing tension to the story: Chuy's astral body is disappearing bit by bit, and as the tale ends, so too does the audience's knowledge of Chuy's ultimate destiny.

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Publishers Weekly

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In this winning combination of a thriller and a comedy, Hector and his ``carnal'' (Spanish for blood brother), Mando, two realistically represented teens from East L.A., are first excited and then scared when they and Hector's Uncle Julio become the only witnesses to a robbery.

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Publishers Weekly

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In this sharply honed collection of stories, Mexican American children on the brink of adolescence are testing the waters, trying to find their place in a world ruled by gangs and ""marked with graffiti, boom boxes, lean dogs behind fences...."" Some characters (La G era, a shoplifter, and Mario,...

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Publishers Weekly

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In Soto's simple, short lines, these poems are as lean and avid as their protagonist, and they gather an impressive force with their quick rhythms and recurrent images: a hand encrusted with dirt, or an orange--its sudden bolt of color and its juice, the poet's manna.

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To make matters worse, his new coach seems to hold a grudge against both Lincoln and his former school, Franklin Junior High.

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Examiner

In all honesty, this poem is quite a bit longer than I usually like, and my dislike of the poem could be more of a testament to my love of haikus and relatively short works of poetry than to my thoughts on his style of writing, which I am, generally speaking, quite fond of.

Feb 25 2011 | Read Full Review of Gary Soto: New and Selected P...

Examiner

"Lucky Luis" by Gary Soto and illustrated by Rhode Montijo is the story of a young rabbit named Luis whose father was a "champ" baseball player.

Mar 03 2012 | Read Full Review of Gary Soto: New and Selected P...

Examiner

While I fell hard for just three of Soto’s poems in this collection, I wholeheartedly recommend reading “A Fire in My Hands.” I imagine that book lovers will enjoy his use of imagery and will, perhaps, be inspired by the subject matter.

Feb 15 2011 | Read Full Review of Gary Soto: New and Selected P...

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