George Washington's Breakfast by Jean Fritz

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"George W. Allen is a boy who never gives up until he finds out what he wants to know--in this case, what his namesake ate for breakfast . . . The sprightly, humorous story and likable colored illustrations bring history alive and make research meaningful."--Booklist.

About Jean Fritz

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Jean Fritz was born on November 16, 1915 in Hankow, China. The only child of missionary parents, she lived in a French compound, attended a British school,and spoke fluent Chinese. She received her A. B. degree in 1937 from Wheaton College and also studied at Columbia University. Fritz has worked as a research assistant, a children's librarian from 1937 to 1941, a teacher for the Board of Cooperative Educational Service, a lecturer, and faculty member at Appalachian State University, from 1980-1982. She also founded the Jean Fritz Writer's Workshops and taught writing from 1961 to 1969. Fritz published her first book, Bunny Hopewell's First Spring, in 1954. Fritz was awarded the Regina Medal by the Catholic Library Association, the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award by the American Library Association, and honored with the Knickerbocker Award for Juvenile Literature, presented by the New York State Library Association for her body of work. Other awards include Outstanding Pennsylvania Author, 1978; Honor Award for Nonfiction, Washington, D.C. Children's Book Guild, 1978-1979; Boston Globe Horn Book Honor Book Award, 1980, for Stonewall; American Book Award nomination, 1981, for Traitor: The Case of Benedict Arnold; Child Study Award and Christopher Award, both 1982; Newbery Honor Book Award, American Book Award and Boston Globe Horn Book Honor Book Award, all 1983, for Homesick: My Own Story; Boston Globe Horn Book Nonfiction Award, 1984, for The Double Life of Pocahontas; and Regina Award, 1985. Paul Galdone was born in Budapest, Hungary in 1907 and immigrated to the United States in 1928. Though he was also a painter and sculptor, he is best known as a writer and illustrator of children's books. During his early career Galdone worked in the art department at Doubleday where he designed a successful book jacket. The experience led him to believe that he could make a living as a freelance illustrator. He left behind the working world of New York City when he and his wife moved to rural Rockland County, New York. Many of Galdone's works are adaptations of fairy tales and folktales. Some of these are The House that Jack Built (1961), Cinderella (1978), and Three Aesop Fox Fables (1971). He illustrated the well-known Miss Pickerell Goes to Mars and sequels written by Ellen MacGregor. He has illustrated works by John Greenleaf Whittier, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Edward Lear, and Nathaniel Hawthorne. During his career he illustrated over 100 books and wrote and illustrated several dozen others. Galdone was twice runner up for the Caldecott Medal, in 1957 and 1958. Paul Galdone died in 1986.
Published September 25, 1984 by Putnam Juvenile. 48 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction, Humor & Entertainment. Fiction

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Ultimately George finds the answer in an old book in his own attic: Washington ate "three small Indian hoecakes" -- which is not enough for George, who begins to wonder what Washington had for lunch.

Oct 26 2011 | Read Full Review of George Washington's Breakfast

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