Glass by Ellen Hopkins

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Synopsis

Crank. Glass. Ice. Crystal. Whatever you call it, it's all the same: a monster. And once it's got hold of you, this monster will never let you go.

Kristina thinks she can control it. Now with a baby to care for, she's determined to be the one deciding when and how much, the one calling the shots. But the monster is too strong, and before she knows it, Kristina is back in its grips. She needs the monster to keep going, to face the pressures of day-to-day life. She needs it to feel alive.

Once again the monster takes over Kristina's life and she will do anything for it, including giving up the one person who gives her the unconditional love she craves -- her baby.

The sequel to Crank, this is the continuing story of Kristina and her descent back to hell. Told in verse, it's a harrowing and disturbing look at addiction and the damage that it inflicts.
 

About Ellen Hopkins

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Ellen Hopkins is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Crank, Burned, Impulse, Glass, Identical, Tricks, Fallout, Perfect, Tilt, and Smoke, as well as the adult novels Triangles and Collateral. She lives with her family in Carson City, Nevada, where she has founded Ventana Sierra, a nonprofit youth housing and resource initiative. Visit her at EllenHopkins.com and on Facebook, and follow her on Twitter at @EllenHopkinsYA. For more information on Ventana Sierra, go to VentanaSierra.org.
 
Published June 20, 2008 by Margaret K. McElderry Books. 720 pages
Genres: Young Adult, Literature & Fiction, Health, Fitness & Dieting. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Glass

Kirkus Reviews

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Despite feeling warmth for her newborn baby and having been off meth for months, 17-year-old Kristina can’t bear “the mindless / tedium that is my life” and seeks relief in “Mexican meth .

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Publishers Weekly

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She again experiments with form, sometimes writing two parallel poems that can be read together or separately (sometimes these experiments seem a bit cloying, as in “Santa Is Coming,” a concrete poem in the shape of a Christmas tree).

Aug 13 2007 | Read Full Review of Glass

Common Sense Media

I think its a great book for teenagers to read so they know what will happen in your life, If you start to do drugs, Because i don't think us parents will want to tell our kids if we ever did drugs.

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Common Sense Media

I think this book is truly amazing and goes through the life Of Kristina Snow, giving very detailed experiences of her using the monster drug, meth, I think that all kids 12+ should read this book because it teaches kids that if your gonna do drugs then you ARE going to pay the price(whether it b...

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Common Sense Media

Our star rating assesses the media's overall quality.Find out more Parents need to know that this book is about a girl's drug addiction: Not only does Kristina use meth constantly, but eventually she also deals it for the Mexican Mafia.

Aug 21 2007 | Read Full Review of Glass

Project MUSE

He was hated first by Whigs when he remained allied with President John Tyler when the latter was read out of the party for vetoing the economic legislation central to the party's program, and then hated even more when as the president of the initial Democratic national convention in 1860, he so ...

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Project MUSE

The Barovier family is struggling to uphold their legacy of making fine glass in fifteenth-century Murano, Italy, but they are badly in need of an infusion of cash to keep both furnaces working.

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Project MUSE

Affecting the most basic elements of Victorian life -- the vagaries of desire, the rationalization of social life, the gendering of subjectivity, the power of nostalgia, the fear of mortality, the cyclical routines of the household -- the ambivalence generated by commodity culture organizes the t...

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Project MUSE

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News Review.

INDENTURED DYSFUNCTION Poor Cinderella (Trisha Hopkins), always on her knees to serve her evil step-family, (from left) Minerva (Jill Miller), the stepmother (Drenia Acosta) and Calliope (Dominique Worden).

Jan 13 2005 | Read Full Review of Glass

Reader Rating for Glass
89%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 180 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


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