Globalisation, Global Justice and Social Work by Iain Ferguson

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Synopsis

Globalization has become a seemingly unstoppable force over recent decades and, in its wake, global notions of social justice have developed in response to its negative aspects. Neo-liberal economic policies have been a key element in the wider process of globalization, and these policies have had a profound impact on welfare provision and the shape of social work practice. Arising dissatisfaction among users of welfare and social work services is fuelling the search for a new, more radical social work that is firmly rooted in principles of social justice.


Globalisation, Global Justice and Social Work explores the global effects of neo-liberal policies on welfare services in different countries, with contributions from social work academics, practitioners and welfare activists around the world. The first section of the book presents case studies of impact of neo-liberalism on welfare systems, social service provision and the practice of social work. In the second section the chapters explore the relationship between social work practice and the struggle for social justice. Authors discuss the personal and political dilemmas they have had to address in seeking to link a personal commitment to social justice with their daily practice as workers and educators in social work. The final section assesses the prospects for social work practice based on notions of social justice, by looking at what can be learned from the experience of previous radical movements as well as from emergent global and local movements.

 

About Iain Ferguson

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Iain Ferguson is a lecturer in social work at the University of Striling. He has written widely on issues of service user involement (particularly in the area of mental health), participatory and emancipatory research, asylum seekers and social welfare theory. Prior to moving into academic life, he worked for many years as a social worker and community worker and he is a qualified Mental Health Officer.Michael Lavalette is a lecturer in Social Policy at the University of Liverpool. He has written widely on issues of child labour, the politics of childhood, social welfare and social movement activity.Elizabeth Whitmore is a Professor, at the School of Social Work, Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada). She has been a teacher, practitioner and activist for many years. She teaches a graduate course on International Social Development at Carleton. Her interest in social justice and the connections between globalisation and social work stems from many years working internationally and recognizing the connections between larger systemic ideologies and local realties. She has an established and recognized record of participation in the field of international social work. She is currently Past President, North American and Caribbean Association of Schools of Social Work (2000-2004) and Chair, Katherine Kendall Award Committee, International Association of Schools of Social Work (2000-2002). In the recent past she has been a Member, Program Committee, Joint International Conference of the International Association of Schools of Social Work and the International Federation of Social Workers (1998-2000) and President, North American Caribbean Regional Association of Schools of Social Work (1996-2000).
 
Published August 15, 2005 by Routledge. 263 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, Political & Social Sciences, Professional & Technical, Law & Philosophy. Non-fiction

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