God and Man at Yale by William F. Buckley
The Superstitions of 'Academic Freedom'

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Synopsis

“For God, for country, and for Yale…in that order,” William F. Buckley Jr. wrote as the dedication of his monumental work—a compendium of knowledge that still resonates within the halls of the Ivy League university that tried to cover up its political and religious bias. Buckley’s harsh assessment of his alma mater divulged the reality behind the institution’s wholly secular education, even within the religion department and divinity school. Unabashed, one former Yale student details the importance of Christianity and heralds the modern conservative movement in his preeminent tell-all, God and Man at Yale: The Superstitions of “Academic Freedom.”
 

About William F. Buckley

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William F. Buckley Jr., the founder of the National Review and host of TVa (TM)s longest-running program, Firing Line, was the author of many works of nonfiction, as well as eleven novels. He died in 2008.
 
Published February 6, 2012 by Regnery Publishing. 304 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Business & Economics, Education & Reference, History, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction

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Mr. Buckley's concern in this essay (his own term) is the "net impact of Yale education" and he points out the various ways in which Yale seriously fails its undergraduates- particularly in the lack of a religious attitude and a "recognition of the merits of our economic system".

Oct 13 2011 | Read Full Review of God and Man at Yale: The Supe...

The New Republic

The rest of the book attempts a larger argument about how the Yale administration’s permissive attitude toward sex—from Sex Week seminars with porn stars and sex toy distributors, to racy movies in Spanish language classes, to hook-ups between people who (gasp) aren’t dating—is degrading ...

Aug 30 2012 | Read Full Review of God and Man at Yale: The Supe...

National Review Online

Rather than pass along to coming generations eternal truths received from previous ones — essentially, that all human freedoms emanate not from the generosity of the state but from the hand of God and that this tenet was superior to all others — universities had embraced what Buckley would later ...

Nov 10 2011 | Read Full Review of God and Man at Yale: The Supe...

National Review Online

Although not the first 20th-century volume to voice conservative criticisms of liberalism in higher education, God and Man at Yale remains the locus classicus for what is now a burgeoning genre of conservative social criticism: the exposure of liberal bias and hypocrisy in American academe.

Nov 10 2011 | Read Full Review of God and Man at Yale: The Supe...

National Review Online

I’m sure not as smart as I need to be to do what he did as well as he did it — and I’m not much for proselytizing, either — but thanks to Buckley’s little book, I don’t feel much compulsion to avoid the topic of God in conversation.

Feb 29 2008 | Read Full Review of God and Man at Yale: The Supe...

National Review Online

(He suggested that Yale give itself to the State of Connecticut: Connecticut could pay its bills, and modern Yale could not say why it should remain private, though Bill added that he could.) One aspect of God and Man at Yale’s original impact has vanished.

Nov 10 2011 | Read Full Review of God and Man at Yale: The Supe...

truthdig

He believed that the purpose of education was not to keep students up to date, but to introduce them to eternal truths and provide them with the means for defending them.” To defend religion on account of its ability to provide eternal truths (or, for that matter, truths of any sort) is a far c...

Apr 02 2009 | Read Full Review of God and Man at Yale: The Supe...

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