Going Postal by Stephen Jaramillo

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Synopsis

Our hero's name is Steve Reeves. He's similar - in name only - to the actor who used to play Hercules. He's the son of a postman who's been losing it for decades. He's got a girlfriend he's not so sure about, a demeaning job at BagelWorks, and a crappy car. Things are not going well for Steve. He just went home for his sister's wedding (to another postman) and hates his family more than ever. His Dad just gave him a gun, and he doesn't know who to shoot first. His girlfriend just dumped him (now he's sure), he just lost his demeaning job, and his car still stinks. What's a jobless, dreamless, girl-less twentynothing to do? Scam money off his deaf grandmother. Drink before noon with his equally pathetic friends. Keep the gun. And try to keep from Going Postal.
 

About Stephen Jaramillo

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Stephan Jaramillo is a chef and a writer living in Berkeley, California. He is the author of the novels, Going Postal and Chocolate Jesus.
 
Published February 15, 2011 by The New York Public Library. 696 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Going Postal

Kirkus Reviews

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The title is the only funny thing about this fictional memoir of a mailman's son, a 27-year-old slacker who's haunted by ``the Evil Seed of Postal Hate.'' His juvenile rants and violent fantasies add to the sense that he's really just slumming in Bukowski-land.

May 20 2010 | Read Full Review of Going Postal

Publishers Weekly

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Bringing a fresh humor to the old news of burnt-out 1990s youth, first-novelist Jaramillo tells an alternately sentimental and scathing tale about the hardknock life of a Bay Area slacker. At 27, Berk

Apr 28 1997 | Read Full Review of Going Postal

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