Gone to Texas by Randolph B. Campbell
A History of the Lone Star State

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Synopsis

In Gone to Texas, historian Randolph Campbell ranges from the first arrival of humans in the Panhandle some 10,000 years ago to the dawn of the twenty-first century, offering an interpretive account of the land, the successive waves of people who have gone to Texas, and the conflicts that have made Texas as much a metaphor as a place.
Campbell presents the epic tales of Texas history in a new light, offering revisionist history in the best sense--broadening and deepening the traditional story, without ignoring the heroes of the past. The scope of the book is impressive. It ranges from the archeological record of early Native Americans to the rise of the oil industry and ultimately the modernization of Texas. Campbell provides swift-moving accounts of the Mexican revolution against Spain, the arrival of settlers from the United States, and the lasting Spanish legacy (from place names to cattle ranching to civil law). The author also paints a rich portrait of the Anglo-Texan revolution, with its larger-than-life leaders and epic battles, the fascinating decade of the Republic of Texas, and annexation by the United States. In his account of the Civil War and Reconstruction, he examines developments both in local politics and society and in the nation at large (from the debate over secession to the role of Texas troops in the Confederate army to the impact of postwar civil rights laws). Late nineteenth-century Texas is presented as part of both the Old West and the New South. The story continues with an analysis of the impact of the Populist and Progressive movements and then looks at the prosperity decade of the 1920s and the economic disaster of the Great Depression. Campbell's last chapters show how World War II brought economic recovery and touched off spectacular growth that, with only a few downturns, continues until today.
Lucid, engaging, deftly written, Gone to Texas offers a fresh understanding of why Texas continues to be seen as a state unlike any other, a place that distills the essence of what it means to be an American.
 

About Randolph B. Campbell

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Randolph B. Campbell is a Professor of History at the University of North Texas. A past president of the Texas State Historical Association, he is the author or co-author of seven books on nineteenth-century Texas history, including Sam Houston and the American Southwest and An Empire for Slavery: The Peculiar Institution in Texas, 1821-1865.
 
Published August 7, 2003 by Oxford University Press, USA. 514 pages
Genres: History, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Gone to Texas

Kirkus Reviews

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Sweeping history of the outsized state and its bellwether politics.

Jun 24 2010 | Read Full Review of Gone to Texas: A History of t...

Publishers Weekly

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Anyone who believes that the history of Texas is written only in tub-thumping braggadocio will quickly be set straight by this superb history of the Lone Star State. A leading historian of Texas (<

May 26 2003 | Read Full Review of Gone to Texas: A History of t...

Publishers Weekly

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Anyone who believes that the history of Texas is written only in tub-thumping braggadocio will quickly be set straight by this superb history of the Lone Star State.

| Read Full Review of Gone to Texas: A History of t...

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