Goodtime Girl by Tess Fragoulis

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Through Kivelli, Fragoulis examines lives in flux in the unsettling realm of “afterward”, where any view beyond tomorrow remains hazy. The Goodtime Girl proves that, while living in the past is pointless, a story recreating another time and place can engage and inform without employing rose-coloured glasses.
-National Post arts

Synopsis

Young Kivelli loses everything when the Great Fire of 1922 razes her home city of Smyrna. She is stranded with other refugees in Piraeus, and ends up living in a brothel. Fortunately, the beauty of her singing voice leads to a recording career and a slow climb out of abject poverty. Although Kivelli's lot in life and love improves, she still longs for the lost magic of her youth in Smyrna.
 

About Tess Fragoulis

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Tess Fragoulis is the author of two works of fiction, including the short story collection Stories to Hide from Your Mother, which was a finalist for the Quebec Writers Federation First Book Prize in 1998. Born in Crete, she has also lived in Holland and Toronto. She now lives in Montreal, where she teaches part-time at Concordia University.
 
Published April 30, 2010 by Cormorant Books. 322 pages
Genres: History, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Goodtime Girl
All: 2 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 0

National Post arts

Above average
Reviewed by Ingrid Ruthig on Jul 27 2012

Through Kivelli, Fragoulis examines lives in flux in the unsettling realm of “afterward”, where any view beyond tomorrow remains hazy.

Read Full Review of Goodtime Girl | See more reviews from National Post arts

National Post arts

Good
Reviewed by Ingrid Ruthig on Jul 27 2012

Through Kivelli, Fragoulis examines lives in flux in the unsettling realm of “afterward”, where any view beyond tomorrow remains hazy. The Goodtime Girl proves that, while living in the past is pointless, a story recreating another time and place can engage and inform without employing rose-coloured glasses.

Read Full Review of Goodtime Girl | See more reviews from National Post arts

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