Graham Greene by Richard Greene
A Life in Letters

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Synopsis

This absorbing autobiography in letters offers a remarkable window into the life of one of the greatest novelists of our time. "The Best Book of the Year." --David Lodge, The Guardian [UK]

One of the undisputed masters of twentieth-century English prose, Graham Greene (1904-1991) wrote tens of thousands of personal letters. This exemplary volume presents a new and engrossing account of his life constructed out of his own words. Impeccably edited by scholar Richard Greene, the letters--including many unavailable even to his official biographer--give a new perspective on a life that combined literary achievement, political action, espionage, travel, and romantic entanglement. The letters describe his travels in such places as Mexico, Vietnam, and Cuba, where he observed the struggles of mankind with a compassionate and truthful eye. Letters to friends such as Evelyn Waugh and Muriel Spark offer a glimpse into the literary culture in which he wrote, while others reveal the agonies of his heart. The sheer range of experience contained in Greene's correspondence defies comparison. 8 pages
 

About Richard Greene

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Born in 1904, Graham Greene was the son of a headmaster and the fourth of six children. Preferring to stay home and read rather than endure the teasing at school that was a by-product of his father's occupation, Greene attempted suicide several times and eventually dropped out of school at the age of 15. His parents sent him to an analyst in London who recommended he try writing as therapy. He completed his first novel by the time he graduated from college in 1925. Greene wrote both entertainments and serious novels. Catholicism was a recurring theme in his work, notable examples being The Power and the Glory (1940) and The End of the Affair (1951). Popular suspense novels include: The Heart of the Matter, Our Man in Havana and The Quiet American. Greene was also a world traveler and he used his experiences as the basis for many books. One popular example, Journey Without Maps (1936), was based on a trip through the jungles of Liberia. Greene also wrote and adapted screenplays, including that of the 1949 film, The Third Man, which starred Orson Welles. He died in Vevey, Switzerland in 1991. Richard Greene (no relation) was educated at Oxford University and is now an associate professor at the University of Toronto. His next book is a biography of British poet Edith Sitwell. He lives in Cobourg, Ontario.
 
Published October 16, 2007 by Knopf Canada. 480 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Graham Greene

The New York Times

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RAHAM GREENE lived, and thrived, in an age when writers were powerful, priestlike, remote and elusive.

Oct 17 2004 | Read Full Review of Graham Greene: A Life in Letters

The New York Times

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“The whole war,” he writes in one of the few revealing letters collected in “Graham Greene: A Life in Letters,” “is good for someone like me who has always suffered from an anxiety neurosis.” “The prospect of peace now,” he worries in 1943 from Sierra Leone, “would fill me with utter gloom.” I...

Jan 02 2009 | Read Full Review of Graham Greene: A Life in Letters

The Guardian

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Graham Greene: A Life in Letters edited by Richard Greene 384pp, Little, Brown, £20 The British establishment has produced its fair share of turncoats.

Sep 22 2007 | Read Full Review of Graham Greene: A Life in Letters

The Guardian

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The Life of Graham Greene, Volume 3: 1955-1991 by Norman Sherry 906pp, Cape, £25 Professor Norman Sherry's battle to understand and explain the life of Graham Greene is a legend of modern biography.

Oct 09 2004 | Read Full Review of Graham Greene: A Life in Letters

The Guardian

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It is the tension between the two faces of Brighton – the illuminated tourist bling and the gritty, mobster-laced industry behind the façade – that sets up the intrigue in Greene's classic 1938 novel of good and evil;

Feb 06 2011 | Read Full Review of Graham Greene: A Life in Letters

The New York Review of Books

The Power and the Glory, first published fifty years ago in a modest English edition of 3,500 copies, is generally agreed to be Graham Greene’s masterpiece, the book of his held highest in popular as well as critical esteem.

Aug 16 1990 | Read Full Review of Graham Greene: A Life in Letters

The New York Review of Books

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The Paris Review

they are written from the same point of view .

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