Growing Up Black in Rural Mississippi by Chalmers Archer
Memories of a Family, Heritage of a Place

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Synopsis

A memoir that brings to life the hardships and heroism of a black family in the rural South. Beginning with the Depression and concluding on the eve of great social change in the 1950s, Archer weaves together family experiences, tales and legends, history and sociology, and creates an authentic account that will appeal to readers interested in family and ethnic heritage. (Walker and Company)
 

About Chalmers Archer

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Archer is an accomplished writer and educator who recently retired as a professor and administrator at Northern Virginia Community College. He is the recipient of several awards, including the Mississippi Institute of Arts and Leters Award for Nonfiction.
 
Published February 1, 1992 by Walker & Co. 156 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction

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Working with the Mississippi soil, folk remedies, ingenious foods (there's a recipe here for walnut-cider rice), and the spiritual cement of the local church, blacks built a bulwark against the outer world: the ever- threatening presence of Klan lynchings, Jim Crow laws, police brutality, grindin...

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Publishers Weekly

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``The black families of the Delta deserve a special place in history,'' writes Archer, professor at Northern Virginia Community College.

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