Haiti Noir by Edwidge Danticat
(Akashic Noir)

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"A wide-ranging collection from the beloved but besieged Caribbean island. […] The 36th entry in Akashic's Noir series (which ranges from Bronx to Delhi to Twin Cities) is beautifully edited, with a spectrum of voices."
--Kirkus Reviews

"Danticat has succeeded in assembling a group portrait of Haitian culture and resilience that is cause for celebration."
--Publishers Weekly

"A solid contribution to the [noir] series, especially for its showcasing of a setting not commonly portrayed in crime fiction."

“Who can ever judge how important Danticat has been to Americans’ understanding and re-evaluating Haiti’s position and role in the hemisphere? Not just as a novelist and essayist in her own right, but as editor and guiding force behind this collection of short stories and the re-publication and English translation of the Chauvet triptych, the Haitian-born Danticat has brought her country’s literature back into the world of English-speakers. Filled with delights and surprises, Haiti Noir, taken as a whole, provides a profound portrait of the country, from its crises to its triumphs, from the tiny bouks of the countryside to the shanties of the sprawling bidonvilles. Danticat herself has a lovely story in the collection, and permits two distinguished foreign writers on Haiti, Madison Smartt Bell and Mark Kurlansky, to slide in there among all the brilliant Haitians.”
--Daily Beast

Includes brand-new stories by: Edwidge Danticat, Rodney Saint-Eloi, Madison Smartt Bell, Gary Victor, M.J. Fièvre, Marvin Victor, Yanick Lahens, Louis-Philipe Dalembert, Kettly Mars, Marie Ketsia Theodore-Pharel, Evelyne Trouillot, Katia Ulysse, Ibi Aanu Zoboi, Nadine Pinede, and others.

Haiti has a tragic history and continues to be one of the most destitute places on the planet, especially in the aftermath of the earthquake. Here, however, Edwidge Danticat reveals that even while the subject matter remains dark, the caliber of Haitian writing is of the highest order.

About Edwidge Danticat

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Edwidge Danticat was born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, in 1969. Her parents emigrated to New York when she was a small child, while she and her brother remained in Haiti, where they were raised by an aunt and uncle. At the age of twelve she moved to Brooklyn to be with her parents. Danticat began writing as a teenager, and her essays and stories have appeared in many periodicals. She received a degree in French literature from Barnard College and an MFA in writing from Brown University. At Brown she completed work on Breath, Eyes, Memory, which she had begun as an undergraduate, and the novel was published in 1994. After finishing her master's degree, Danticat worked in Clinica Estetico, the production office of film director Jonathan Demme, who has a consuming interest in Haiti. She read and wrote scripts and continues to monitor and occasionally protest American policy in Haiti. In late 1994, Danticat returned to Haiti for the first time in thirteen years, to see President Aristide restored to power. Danticat is the recipient of a James Michener Fellowship and awards from Seventeen magazine and from Essence. She is also the author of a collection of Haitian stories, Krik? Krak!, which was a National Book Award finalist, and the novel, The Farming of Bones (1998). She lives in New York City.
Published December 7, 2010 by Akashic Books. 317 pages
Genres: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Haiti Noir

Kirkus Reviews

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The 18 new stories, most by native Haitians, are introduced by Haitian-born National Book Award finalist Danticat.

Dec 02 2010 | Read Full Review of Haiti Noir (Akashic Noir)

The New York Times

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... Johnny Temple, the publisher of Akashic Books, said that readers should ... A Los
Angeles Times review said the “Haiti Noir” collection includes ...

Jan 10 2011 | Read Full Review of Haiti Noir (Akashic Noir)


“I started going to Haiti in 1995, once or twice a year, to research my books and then because I got to love it.” This is not the first time Bell has written about Haiti and when asked about his fascination with the island the author sums it up with a declaration by his character in Twenty Dolla...

Feb 07 2011 | Read Full Review of Haiti Noir (Akashic Noir)

Los Angeles Times

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Though many of the books in Akashic's noir series seem geared to reflect a city back to its readers — Koreatown, Los Feliz and the Fairfax district make appearances in "Los Angeles Noir" — "Haiti Noir" is presenting a country mostly to readers who never have been there.

Jan 02 2011 | Read Full Review of Haiti Noir (Akashic Noir)

Christian Science Monitor

In 2004, the Brooklyn-based independent publisher Akashic Books released “Brooklyn Noir,” a collection of all-new crime stories, each set in a different neighborhood of the borough.

Feb 01 2011 | Read Full Review of Haiti Noir (Akashic Noir)

Reviewing the Evidence

Though the final scene is laugh-out-loud funny, the story also includes an interpolated folktale about African animals left behind when Haiti separated from its homeland, and a caged leopard whose freedom is finally ransomed.

| Read Full Review of Haiti Noir (Akashic Noir)

Fiction Writers Review

But I hope in the meantime, we continue – through collections like Haiti Noir – to support Haiti by reading her writers, remembering her struggles, and listening to her stories.

Jan 19 2011 | Read Full Review of Haiti Noir (Akashic Noir)

Fiction Writers Review

Renowned for her stirring and insightful stories about Haitian life, Edwidge Danticat recently turned her eye to genre as the editor of Haiti Noir, part of Akashic Books’ noir series.

Jul 16 2012 | Read Full Review of Haiti Noir (Akashic Noir)

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