Henry James by Henry James
Confidence

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Synopsis

First serialised in Scribners magazine in 1879 and published in full during the same year, Confidence is a light romantic comedy of marriage declined and accepted. The plot centres upon three characters, Bernie Longueville, an artist, Gordy Wright, a scientist, and Angie Vivien without occupation but a strong, gregarious female. When Gordy asks Bernie whether he should marry Angela, Bernie, having already met her, advises against it. Yet later, when Bernie again meet Angela, he realises that he loves her himself and proposes. Confidence is unusual for James in that it is light and comedic. While there are familiar themes including the pressure to marry, it is the treatment that marks it out. There is also an impression that James was keen to provide a resolution in the set of relationships and critics have suggested that the one provides, and its means, was somewhat contrived.
 

About Henry James

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Henry James (1843-1916), born in New York City, was the son of noted religious philosopher Henry James, Sr., and brother of eminent psychologist and philosopher William James. He spent his early life in America and studied in Geneva, London and Paris during his adolescence to gain the worldly experience so prized by his father. He lived in Newport, went briefly to Harvard Law School, and in 1864 began to contribute both criticism and tales to magazines. In 1869, and then in 1872-74, he paid visits to Europe and began his first novel, Roderick Hudson. Late in 1875 he settled in Paris, where he met Turgenev, Flaubert, and Zola, and wrote The American (1877). In December 1876 he moved to London, where two years later he achieved international fame with Daisy Miller. Other famous works include Washington Square (1880), The Portrait of a Lady (1881), The Princess Casamassima (1886), The Aspern Papers (1888), The Turn of the Screw (1898), and three large novels of the new century, The Wings of the Dove (1902), The Ambassadors (1903) and The Golden Bowl (1904). In 1905 he revisited the United States and wrote The American Scene (1907). During his career he also wrote many works of criticism and travel. Although old and ailing, he threw himself into war work in 1914, and in 1915, a few months before his death, he became a British subject. In 1916 King George V conferred the Order of Merit on him. He died in London in February 1916.
 
Published June 4, 2015 by Titan Read. 179 pages
Genres: Romance, Biographies & Memoirs, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Literature & Fiction, Education & Reference, Religion & Spirituality. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Henry James

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Why did two of today's top novelists tangle with Henry James in the same year? Terry Eagleton gets beyond the obvious

Jun 24 2006 | Read Full Review of Henry James: Confidence

Tampa Bay Times

Banville writes of Isabel, "Strange: It was she who had been wronged, grievously wronged, by her husband, and by a woman whom she had considered, if not her ally, then not her enemy either, yet it was she herself who felt the shame of the thing."

Dec 21 2017 | Read Full Review of Henry James: Confidence
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