Henry Wadsworth Longfellow by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Poems and Other Writings (Library of America)

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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: Poems
 

About Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) was the most popular and admired American poet of the nineteenth century. Born in Portland, Maine, and educated at Bowdoin College, Longfellow's ambition was always to become a writer; but until mid-life his first profession was the teaching rather than the production of literature, at his alma mater (1829-35) and then at Harvard (1836-54). His teaching career was punctuated by two extended study-tours of Europe, during which Longfellow made himself fluent in all the major Romance and Germanic languages. Thanks to a fortunate marriage and the growing popularity of his work, from his mid-thirties onwards Longfellow, ensconced in a comfortable Cambridge mansion, was able to devote an increasingly large fraction of his energies to the long narrative historical and mythic poems that made him a household word, especially Evangeline (1847), The Song of Hiawatha (1855), The Courtship of Miles Standish (1858), and Tales of a Wayside Inn (1863, 1872, 1873). Versatile as well as prolific, Longfellow also won fame as a writer of short ballads and lyrics, and experimented in the essay, the short story, the novel, and the verse drama. Taken as a whole, Longfellow's writings show a breadth of literary learning, an understanding of western languages and cultures, unmatched by any American writer of his time.
 
Published August 28, 2000 by Library of America. 825 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

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Her images match the drama of the poem: the British ship Somerset, “A phantom ship, with each mast and spar / Across the moon like a prison bar,” is seen over the shoulder of the rower “with muffled oar.” Later, Revere is framed in a window through which the reader is gazing, giving word to a wom...

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The poem itself can be stuffily old-fashioned in syntax and occasionally its rhyme scheme mires down, but the illustrations, which capture both the movements of the British and the desperate stealth of Revere and his friend, help to carry the reader along.

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Longfellow’s famous narrative poem gains a renewed sense of foreboding and urgency thanks to Thompson’s stark and somber illustrations.

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By the shore of Gitchee Gumee,/ By the shining Big-Sea-Water... Between the Civil War and the Great Depression, Longfellow (1807-1882) was America's best-loved poet. An audience so broad it's now

Aug 28 2000 | Read Full Review of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: P...

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Longfellow's well-known poem ""never appeared to better advantage,"" said PW, noting that ""Rand has created a rich rendition of the Revolutionary landscape."" A Spanish-language reprint will be issued simultaneously ($4.99 -05576-0).

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If a few of the spreads are difficult to distinguish (e.g., "The shadowy something far away,/ Where the river widens to meet the bay" that triggers the lamplighter's signal cannot be deciphered, for instance, and it is hard to tell that there's a "second lamp in the belfry"), aspiring historians ...

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Later, his approach results in a climactic view of the harbor as the British boats begin to cross the Charles River under a full moon: readers see just the outline of the North Church's steeple and the river stretching before them, as if they are in the position of lighting the two lanterns--the ...

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For Paul Revere's Ride: The Landlord's Tale by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Charles Santore assumes the perspective of the narrator's ""friend."" For ""Listen, my children, and you shall hear/ Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,"" an elderly, dapper gentleman leans forward in front of a fire ...

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By the shore of Gitchee Gumee,/ By the shining Big-Sea-Water... Between the Civil War and the Great Depression, Longfellow (1807-1882) was America's best-loved poet. An audience so broad it's now

Aug 28 2000 | Read Full Review of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: P...

ForeWord Reviews

Other poems that may be familiar are: “Christmas Bells,” set to music by Johnny Marks in this century, and—from the epic “Song of Hiawatha”—“Hiawatha’s Childhood.” The latter could be enjoyed by children as young as five, although most of the poems in this collection are more appropriate for the ...

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More Mona Simpson "We all — in the end — die in medias res.

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