Here Where the Sunbeams Are Green by Helen Phillips

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Synopsis

Rebecca Stead, Newbery Medal-winning author of When You Reach Me, said this book is "brimming with surprises and grand adventure. Brave, smart, and full of heart, Madeline and Ruby are a gust of fresh air."
   Mad's dad is the Bird Guy. He'll go anywhere to study birds. So when he's offered a bird-tracking job in Central America, his bags are packed and he's jungle bound.
   But going bird tracking in the jungle and disappearing completely are very different things, and when the Very Strange and Incredibly Creepy Letter arrives, Mad can't shake the terrible feeling that her father is in trouble.
   Roo, Mad's younger sister, is convinced that the letter is a coded message. And their mom is worried, because the letter doesn't sound like Dad at all. But Mad is sure it's a sign of something sinister.
   The only way to get to the bottom of it is to go to Lava Bird Volcano and find their dad themselves. Though they never could have imagined what they're about to discover.
   From new talent Helen Phillips, Here Where the Sunbeams Are Green is the story of what can happen when two sisters make some unusual friends, trust in each other, and bravely face a jungle of trouble all to bring their family back together.


From the Hardcover edition.
 

About Helen Phillips

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HELEN PHILLIPS is the recipient of a 2009 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer's Award, the 2009 Meridian Editors' Prize, and the 2008 Italo Calvino Prize in Fabulist Fiction.
 
Published November 13, 2012 by Delacorte Books for Young Readers. 306 pages
Genres: Nature & Wildlife, Action & Adventure, Children's Books.

Unrated Critic Reviews for Here Where the Sunbeams Are Green

Kirkus Reviews

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When Madeleine and Ruby visit the supergreen rain-forest resort where their ornithologist father has been employed to find endangered species, they find him distressingly changed—and maybe contributing to a bird’s extinction.

Oct 01 2012 | Read Full Review of Here Where the Sunbeams Are G...

Publishers Weekly

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Though it’s not science fiction, there’s more than a little A Wrinkle in Time in this ecological adventure from adult author Phillips (And Yet They Were Happy).

Oct 22 2012 | Read Full Review of Here Where the Sunbeams Are G...

Teen Reads

In fact, Ken/Neth (as Mad dubs him after he requests she call him "Ken") acts like he is now Mad and Roo's father, translating Spanish for the non-Spanish-speaking family members and giving them advice, while somehow seeming to be under the impression he's dealing with toddlers.

Nov 15 2012 | Read Full Review of Here Where the Sunbeams Are G...

City Book Review

I even start to feel like part of the jungle floor, lying there frozen with mud on my face, gazing upward into all those leaves and branches and vines, the cool green light, the layers turning every last sunbeam green.” I like this book;

Feb 08 2013 | Read Full Review of Here Where the Sunbeams Are G...

Story Circle Book Reviews

One of the greatest pleasures for a child is to read a book written for them by an adult who understands imagination and creativity.

Nov 01 2012 | Read Full Review of Here Where the Sunbeams Are G...

Reader Rating for Here Where the Sunbeams Are Green
87%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 13 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


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