Here on Earth by Tim Flannery
A Natural History of the Planet

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Synopsis

Beginning at the moment of creation with the Big Bang, Here on Earth explores the evolution of Earth from a galactic cloud of dust and gas to a planet with a metallic core and early signs of life within a billion years of being created. In a compelling narrative, Flannery describes the formation of the Earth’s crust and atmosphere, as well as the transformation of the planet’s oceans from toxic brews of metals (such as iron, copper, and lead) to life-sustaining bodies covering 70 percent of the planet’s surface. Life, Flannery shows, first appeared in these oceans in the form of microscopic plants and bacteria, and these metals served as catalysts for the earliest biological processes known to exist. From this starting point, Flannery tells the fascinating story of the evolution of our own species, exploring several early human species—from the diminutive creatures (the famed hobbits) who lived in Africa around two million years ago to Homo erectus—before turning his attention to Homo sapiens. Drawing on Charles Darwin’s and Alfred Russell Wallace’s theories of evolution and Lovelock’s Gaia hypothesis, Here on Earth is a dazzling account of life on our planet.
 

About Tim Flannery

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Born in Melbourne in 1956, Tim Flannery is a writer, scientist, and explorer. In 2007 he was named Australian of the Year and in 2011 he was appointed to head the Climate Change Commission established by Australian prime minister Julia Gillard.
 
Published April 5, 2011 by Atlantic Monthly Press. 288 pages
Genres: History, Education & Reference, Nature & Wildlife, Science & Math, Professional & Technical, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction

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Kirkus Reviews

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When he throws his hat in the ring with the Gaians, which seems like a long shot in the face of all the ruinous environmental behavior exhibited by humans—and which Flannery explains in detail—readers will happily join him there, for he has plenty of evidence of the natural world, humans included...

Jan 15 2011 | Read Full Review of Here on Earth: A Natural Hist...

The New York Times

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While detailing the great harm done by humans, Tim Flannery also writes hopefully about the earth’s future.

Jul 15 2011 | Read Full Review of Here on Earth: A Natural Hist...

The Guardian

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The political impact of Flannery's work was great, since his view of the Australian past undermined the proponents of "Big Australia", who imagined for the country an American future of more great cities, widespread agriculture, intensive industrialisation and a burgeoning population.

Mar 26 2011 | Read Full Review of Here on Earth: A Natural Hist...

The Guardian

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That does not necessarily imply a place for human life, but Flannery is drawn to the idea that Earth is a super-organism for which humankind could provide a brain and nervous system.

Mar 20 2011 | Read Full Review of Here on Earth: A Natural Hist...

BC Books

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And within a human are still independent organisms that make up part of what we think of as us - "Without many of these creatures - for example gut bacteria - we could not exist.

May 29 2011 | Read Full Review of Here on Earth: A Natural Hist...

BC Books

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(277) Here on Earth begins and ends with Darwin’s sand walk, and the notion of evolution and ‘survival of the fittest’ and moves through Dawkins’ selfish gene, proposing that, beyond the gene, there’s the mneme – as Flannery presents it, a kind of idea/association/memory that has a physical real...

Oct 24 2010 | Read Full Review of Here on Earth: A Natural Hist...

Los Angeles Times

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The zoologist is optimistic about the odds of human survival but believes it will take sweeping behavioral change.

Apr 22 2011 | Read Full Review of Here on Earth: A Natural Hist...

The Daily Beast

The Forgotten Founding Father: Noah Webster's Obsession and the Creation of an American Culture he shows how Webster's creation of his eponymous dictionary helped engender a feeling of American identity during a time when many felt that the United States should operate as a loose affiliation of ...

Apr 30 2011 | Read Full Review of Here on Earth: A Natural Hist...

Zimbio

share: digg facebook twitter That way you can look up and say: “Whow, did you know that continental drift ensures the saltiness of the ocean remains constant?” (Flannery explains that while water takes 30,000 to 40,000 years to recycle from evaporation in the ocean through precipitation and hence...

Jun 02 2011 | Read Full Review of Here on Earth: A Natural Hist...

LA Times

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April 22 is Earth Day, and for the occasion we've got a review of "Here On Earth" by Tim Flannery.

Apr 22 2011 | Read Full Review of Here on Earth: A Natural Hist...

http://millstonenews.com

Tim Flannery,internationally acclaimed scientist, writer and explorer takes us on a remarkable journey through the natural history of life on planet Earth.

Jul 10 2011 | Read Full Review of Here on Earth: A Natural Hist...

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