Hill of Doors by Robin Robertson

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There are similar dreamscapes, abandoned houses...It's perhaps a little more uneven than the earlier book, with a couple of poems striking what seems to me an uncertain note, but no doubt it will be in the running for prizes, too, and deservedly so.
-Guardian

Synopsis

Charged with strangeness and beauty, Hill of Doors is a haunted and haunting book, where each successive poem seems a shape conjured from the shadows, and where the uncanny is made physically present. The collection sees the return of some familiar members of the Robertson company, including Strindberg – heading, as usual, towards calamity – and the shape-shifter Dionysus. Four loose retellings of stories of the Greek god form pillars for the book, alongside four short Ovid versions. Threaded through these are a series of pieces about the poet’s childhood on the north-east coast, his fascination with the sea and the islands of Scotland. However, the reader will also discover a distinct new note in Robertson’s austere but ravishing poetry: towards the possibility of contentment – a house, a door, a key – finding, at last, a ‘happiness of the hand and heart’. Magisterial in its command and range, indelibly moving and memorable in its speech, Hill of Doors is Robin Robertson’s most powerful book to date.
 

About Robin Robertson

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Robin Robertson is from the north-east coast of Scotland. His four collections of poetry have received the E. M. Forster Award and various Forward Prizes.
 
Published February 28, 2013 by Picador. 96 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for Hill of Doors
All: 2 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 0

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Kate Kellaway on Mar 24 2013

Some poems are as satisfying as novels – but the fullness is always achieved through simplicity. Robertson has sound judgment about when less is more.

Read Full Review of Hill of Doors | See more reviews from Guardian

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Adam Newey on Mar 01 2013

There are similar dreamscapes, abandoned houses...It's perhaps a little more uneven than the earlier book, with a couple of poems striking what seems to me an uncertain note, but no doubt it will be in the running for prizes, too, and deservedly so.

Read Full Review of Hill of Doors | See more reviews from Guardian

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