Hitler, Mussolini, and Me by Charles Davis

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...offers whimsically sardonic yet serious miniessays on feminism, sex, Hitler’s mustache, obscure German literature, and the tragic pervasiveness of anti-Semitism. A sardonic take on human nature and a wry deconstruction of the "banality of evil."
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Synopsis

1938, Hitler visits Italy. An expatriate Irish art historian is obliged to guide Mussolini and his guest round the galleries. Half fascinated, half repelled, he watches the tyrants, wrestling with the uneasy conviction that he ought to use the opportunity to 'do something' about them yet lacking the zeal that might transform misgivings into action.

Thirty years later, his daughter comes across a compromising clipping showing her father with the dictators. Exposed as a collaborator, the narrator explains what happened, what he did and did not do, and why, revealing in the process the part the girl's mother played in promoting the digestive disorders that were to influence the course of the war.

To help his daughter understand, he conjures a time before the crime that would define the century, a time before these men became monsters inflated to fit that crime, showing her the tawdry little people behind the myths, the real Hitler and Mussolini, The Flatulent Windbag and The Constipated Prick.

Based on historical events and using the tyrants' own words, Hitler, Mussolini, and Me brings the dictators down to earth, describing the murkier, more scurrilous aspects of their careers, and using jokes and scatology to weave a crazed pathway toward a cracked kind of morality. It is the story of an ordinary man living in extraordinary times, times when being ordinary was an act of rebellion in itself.
 

About Charles Davis

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One late night in the spring of 1999, Charles Davis wondered what he would do if he could do anything he wanted in the whole world. In a moment that changed his life, he then wondered why he wasn't doing just that. A few weeks later, he said a warm farewell to his career as a federal law enforcement officer, sold or gave away everything he couldn't cram into a U-Haul trailer, and with his dog riding shotgun in his pickup truck, drove a thousand miles from Maine to the Outer Banks of North Carolina. There he rented a small beach house, got a part-time job framing houses and had high hopes of completing his first novel by giving his old stories the time and energy they'd craved.Charles is an avid fisherman and outdoorsman, a fair bluegrass guitar picker, thinks his homemade barbeque sauce is something special and is a college football fanatic. His stories tend to wander here and there, but most eventually drift back down the dirt roads of his past to the hills and hollows of Southwest Virginia, the place where he grew up during the 1960s and 1970s. In his old hometown, stories told on front porches were as commonplace as brown beans and cornbread sitting on a supper table. The author attended Virginia Tech, graduated from Radford University and spent four years as an airborne infantry soldier before beginning a career with the U.S. Marshals Service. He currently lives in New Hampshire with his wife, two children and dog, and is working on his next novel.
 
Published May 31, 2016 by The Permanent Press. 232 pages
Genres: History, Humor & Entertainment, Literature & Fiction, Political & Social Sciences. Fiction
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Kirkus

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on Mar 03 2016

...offers whimsically sardonic yet serious miniessays on feminism, sex, Hitler’s mustache, obscure German literature, and the tragic pervasiveness of anti-Semitism. A sardonic take on human nature and a wry deconstruction of the "banality of evil."

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