Hitler's Scientists by John Cornwell
Science, War, and the Devil's Pact

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Synopsis

An eye-opening account of the rise of science in Germany through to Hitler’s regime, and the frightening Nazi experiments that occurred during the Reich





A shocking account of Nazi science, and a compelling look at the the dramatic rise of German science in the nineteenth century, its preeminence in the early twentieth, and the frightening developments that led to its collapse in 1945, this is the compelling story of German scientists under Hitler’s regime. Weaving the history of science and technology with the fortunes of war and the stories of men and women whose discoveries brought both benefits and destruction to the world, Hitler's Scientists raises questions that are still urgent today. As science becomes embroiled in new generations of weapons of mass destruction and the war against terrorism, as advances in biotechnology outstrip traditional ethics, this powerful account of Nazi science forms a crucial commentary on the ethical role of science.


 

About John Cornwell

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John Cornwell is an award-winning journalist and the author of numerous novels and works of nonfiction. The director of the Science and Human Dimension Project at Cambridge University, Cornwell lives in Cambridge, London, and England.
 
Published September 28, 2004 by Penguin Books. 580 pages
Genres: History, Travel, War, Science & Math, Education & Reference. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Hitler's Scientists

Kirkus Reviews

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To counter the brain drain, Cornwell writes, the renowned scientist Max Planck called on Hitler to plead “that certain Jewish scientists were worth nurturing for the benefit of the state”—which Hitler rejected, saying, “A Jew is a Jew.” Germany’s loss was the Allies’ gain in such critical areas a...

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Publishers Weekly

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Cornwell's devastating bestseller Hitler's Pope is a tough act to follow. Here, the author again claims the moral high ground to critique the ethical and

Aug 25 2003 | Read Full Review of Hitler's Scientists: Science,...

The Guardian

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Hitler's Scientists: Science, War and the Devil's Pact by John Cornwell 535pp, Viking, £20 During the long genesis of Bertolt Brecht's play The Life of Galileo, the most destructive weapon yet invented was unleashed on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Nov 01 2003 | Read Full Review of Hitler's Scientists: Science,...

Publishers Weekly

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Here, the author again claims the moral high ground to critique the ethical and political choices of scientists in Hitler's Germany and to caution that science under the Western democracies in the Cold War and the war on terrorism also wielded and continues to wield the "Janus-faced power for goo...

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BC Books

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In Hitler's Scientists: Science, War and the Devil's Pact, as in his bestselling Hitler's Pope before it, John Cornwell plumbs the history of Nazism for lessons that apply to critical concerns of the present.

Apr 15 2005 | Read Full Review of Hitler's Scientists: Science,...

National Review Online

Second, he suggests that Sakharov’s resistance to the Soviet Union’s ambitions makes Teller look very bad because Teller supported Star Wars.

Mar 11 2004 | Read Full Review of Hitler's Scientists: Science,...

The Sunday Times

Viking £20 pp535 Science is, as Peter Simple in the Telegraph once said, “fun”.

Sep 28 2003 | Read Full Review of Hitler's Scientists: Science,...

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