Hollywood Station by Joseph Wambaugh
A Novel

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Synopsis

A #1 New York Times bestselling author, Joseph Wambaugh invented the modern police procedural thriller. Now in his long-awaited return to the LAPD, he deploys his bone-deep understanding of cops' lives--and a lethal sense of humor--in a stunning new novel.

For a cop, a night on the job means killing time and trying not to get killed. If you're in Hollywood Division, it also means dealing with some of the most desperate criminals anywhere. Now the violent robbery of a Hollywood jewelry store quickly connects to a Russian nightclub and an undercover operation gone wrong, and the sergeant they call the Oracle and his squad of quirky cops have to make sense of it all. From an officer who dreams of stardom, to a single mother packing a breast pump, to partners who'd rather be surfing, they'll take you on a raucous ride through a gritty city where no one is safe. Especially not the cops.
 

About Joseph Wambaugh

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Joseph Wambaugh, a former LAPD detective sergeant, is the bestselling author of 18 prior works of fiction and nonfiction, including The Choirboys and The Onion Field. In 2004, he was named Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America. He lives in southern California.
 
Published November 26, 2006 by Little, Brown and Company. 353 pages
Genres: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Literature & Fiction, Business & Economics. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Hollywood Station

The Guardian

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Hollywood Station by Joseph Wambaugh 340pp, Quercus, £14.99 The word on the crime-fiction street was that Joseph Wambaugh wasn't the force he used to be.

Jan 06 2007 | Read Full Review of Hollywood Station: A Novel

BC Books

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There are exceptions to the adage of “Don’t judge a book by its cover.” Joseph Wambaugh’s new book, Hollywood Station, is definitely an exception to that rule, with a back cover that contains praise from some of the best crime writers around.

Feb 13 2007 | Read Full Review of Hollywood Station: A Novel

BC Books

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After retiring from the LAPD, and after retiring from writing ten years ago, the man who is considered by many to be the father of the modern police novel has decided to start “behaving himself” and go back to writing.

Sep 30 2008 | Read Full Review of Hollywood Station: A Novel

Book Reporter

For this deployment period, the fondly nicknamed Oracle --- a cop with decades on the job to his credit --- partners a crusty cop named Fausto Gamboa with Budgie Polk, a gutsy officer recently returned from maternity leave.

Jan 22 2011 | Read Full Review of Hollywood Station: A Novel

USA Today

A jewelry store heist colored by a creative intimidation method, the imaginative moneymaking schemes of two crystal meth fiends and the search for a hidden cache of money all turn out to be part of a bigger, very satisfying story of good cops, bad cops and the criminals they chase.

Dec 07 2006 | Read Full Review of Hollywood Station: A Novel

About.com Bestsellers

ProsWambaugh presents an insider’s view of the LAPD, one that is fascinating and enlightening.The complexities of work and duty that police officers face are dramatically brought to life.ConsExtremely graphic passages make this book unpleasant to read at times.The dialogue seems forced or stilted...

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Bookmarks Magazine

Joseph Wambaugh set The New Centurions (1971) and The Onion Field (1973) in 1970s Los Angeles, but things have changed quite a bit since then.

Aug 21 2007 | Read Full Review of Hollywood Station: A Novel

Spinetingler Magazine

DavenportTHE BIRTHDAY PRESENT by Gary PonzoLESS THAN LIVING by Jason DukeTHE COLOMBIAN by Fred SnyderBIT PLAYERS by Patricia AbbottSCRITCH by Karen PullenDICTATION by Stephen D.

Feb 25 2010 | Read Full Review of Hollywood Station: A Novel

AuthorsDen

Farley is a small-time crook who thinks he is being smart by making Olive do all the dirty work: fishing envelopes out of mailboxes, trying to pass counterfeit bills in stores, and stealing magnetic cards from hotels which Farley sells to other criminals specializing in identity theft.

Sep 04 2007 | Read Full Review of Hollywood Station: A Novel

Reader Rating for Hollywood Station
76%

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