Homer & Langley by E.L. Doctorow
A Novel

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Told by Homer, the blind brother, who is addressing someone named Jacqueline, it is a curiously soft narrative, even-handed, precise and vaguely matter-of-fact.
-Globe and Mail

Synopsis

Homer and Langley Collyer are brothers—the one blind and deeply intuitive, the other damaged into madness, or perhaps greatness, by mustard gas in the Great War. They live as recluses in their once grand Fifth Avenue mansion, scavenging the city streets for things they think they can use, hoarding the daily newspapers as research for Langley’s proposed dateless newspaper whose reportage will be as prophecy. Yet the epic events of the century play out in the lives of the two brothers—wars, political movements, technological advances—and even though they want nothing more than to shut out the world, history seems to pass through their cluttered house in the persons of immigrants, prostitutes, society women, government agents, gangsters, jazz musicians . . . and their housebound lives are fraught with odyssean peril as they struggle to survive and create meaning for themselves.
 

About E.L. Doctorow

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E. L. DOCTOROW was born in 1931 in New York City and was educated at Kenyon College and Columbia University. His earlier novels are Welcome to Hard Times and Big as Life. Formerly editor-in-chief of a prominent New York publishing house, he was most recently writer-in-residence at the University of California at Irvine. He lives in Westchester County with his wife and three children.
 
Published August 19, 2009 by Random House. 226 pages
Genres: History, Literature & Fiction, Political & Social Sciences, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Homer & Langley
All: 2 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 0

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Xan Brooks on Jan 16 2010

But Homer and Langley is melancholic and minor-key; a sly inversion of his old concerns. One might regard this as a novel of old age in which the Collyer mansion is installed as the physical embodiment of human consciousness; a vessel of memories that becomes congested and precarious as the years go by.

Read Full Review of Homer & Langley: A Novel | See more reviews from Guardian

Globe and Mail

Good
Reviewed by Richard Bausch on Aug 23 2012

Told by Homer, the blind brother, who is addressing someone named Jacqueline, it is a curiously soft narrative, even-handed, precise and vaguely matter-of-fact.

Read Full Review of Homer & Langley: A Novel | See more reviews from Globe and Mail

Reader Rating for Homer & Langley
73%

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