House of Meetings by Martin Amis

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 16 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

An extraordinary, harrowing, endlessly surprising novel from a literary master.

In 1946, two brothers and a Jewish girl fall into alignment in pogrom-poised Moscow. The fraternal conflict then marinates in Norlag, a slave-labor camp above the Arctic Circle, where a tryst in the coveted House of Meetings will haunt all three lovers long after the brothers are released. And for the narrator, the sole survivor, the reverberations continue into the new century.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Martin Amis

See more books from this Author
Martin Amis is the best-selling author of several books, including London Fields, Money, The Information, and, most recently, Experience. He lives in London.
 
Published January 16, 2007 by Vintage. 258 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences, Literature & Fiction, History, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for House of Meetings

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

(It’s telling that the narrator and his daughter both have ties to Chicago, which serves as a backdrop and is so strongly associated with Amis’s literary mentor, Saul Bellow.) Though the novel never succumbs to overbearing polemics, it nevertheless provides a socio-cultural critique of the past s...

| Read Full Review of House of Meetings

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

Martin Amis’s new novel, “House of Meetings,” tackles the same sobering material his 2002 nonfiction book “Koba the Dread” did: Stalin’s slave labor camps and the atrocities committed by the government during the failed “Soviet experiment.” The novel is everything that misguided earlier book was ...

Jan 09 2007 | Read Full Review of House of Meetings

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

Tiptoeing toward death, Martin Amis’s unnamed narrator tries to acquaint his daughter with his grim past in the Soviet Army.

Jan 14 2007 | Read Full Review of House of Meetings

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

House of Meetings by Martin Amis Cape £15.99, pp198 Martin Amis's new novel is billed by its narrator as a love story;

Oct 01 2006 | Read Full Review of House of Meetings

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

House of Meetings by Martin Amis 198pp, Jonathan Cape, £15.99 "There were conjugal visits in the slave camps of the USSR," begins the jacket copy of Martin Amis's 11th novel.

Sep 30 2006 | Read Full Review of House of Meetings

BC Books

See more reviews from this publication

Instead House of Meetings uses the setting to explore character and what is left when our carefully constructed roles in life are stripped away.

Apr 01 2009 | Read Full Review of House of Meetings

BC Books

See more reviews from this publication

However, there are several good reasons to read Never Let Me Go and The Book of Laughter and Forgetting instead of The House of Meetings.

Jan 16 2007 | Read Full Review of House of Meetings

BC Books

See more reviews from this publication

The narrator is, in part, aboard the Georgi Zhukov, on the Yenisei River in the Arctic Circle - a fancy cruiser near the Gulag the narrator was interned in.

Apr 01 2009 | Read Full Review of House of Meetings

Book Reporter

From the outset we know that something happens here that night, and the author dangles this knowledge in front of us in the form of a letter from brother Lev, which the narrator has yet to open.

Jan 22 2011 | Read Full Review of House of Meetings

The Independent

'I have an informal method of evaluating tomes of this kind (729pp)," pronounces Martin Amis of Natasha's Dance: A Cultural History of Russia, one of the many books acknowledged in the endpapers of his new novella House of Meetings.

Oct 01 2006 | Read Full Review of House of Meetings

Open Letters Monthly

Half of the reviews, British and American, of the new Martin Amis, House of Meetings, quote the same list of tortures: “vicings, awlings, lathings, manic jackhammerings, atrocious chiselings.” Martin Amis has written a novel of the Gulag, and no one is calling it a masterpiece.

| Read Full Review of House of Meetings

About.com

A Russian novel, a Gulag novel, a recovery of humanity novel.

| Read Full Review of House of Meetings

London Review of Books

This alarming tirade – ‘strip-searching’, ‘discriminatory stuff’ – descends into confusion in its latter part, in addressing the Islamists’ concerns: ‘I suppose they justify it,’ Amis says, ‘but I don’t think that’s wholly irrational.’ The conjunction here ought to be an ‘and’, unless the Times h...

| Read Full Review of House of Meetings

New York Magazine

Martin Amis wrote House of Meetings while living with his family in the Uruguayan resort town of José Ignacio.

Jan 22 2007 | Read Full Review of House of Meetings

New York Magazine

Michiko Kakutani wrote that his last novel, Yellow Dog, was “like a sendup of a Martin Amis novel written by someone intent on sabotaging his reputation,” and the novelist Tibor Fischer famously dismissed it as “not-knowing-where-to-look bad … like your favourite uncle being caught in a school pl...

Jan 11 2007 | Read Full Review of House of Meetings

Project MUSE

to point readers to some of the ways in which the suicide note metaphor might be understood, explaining that the note's addressee is not another character in the book, not himself or even Self himself, but "you out there, the dear, the gentle" reader, who ought, Amis directs, to proceed "slowly, ...

| Read Full Review of House of Meetings

Reader Rating for House of Meetings
70%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 34 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×