How Pleasant to Know Mr. Lear by Edward Lear
Nonsense Poems

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Synopsis

Presents the following nonsense verses: "How Pleasant to Know Mr. Lear," "The Jumblies," "The Dong with a Luminous Nose," and "The Scroobious Pip."
 

About Edward Lear

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Edward Lear was born in Holloway, England, to Jeremiah (a stockbroker) and Ann Lear, tutored at home by his sister, and briefly attended the Royal Academy schools. Both an author and an illustrator, he earned his living as an artist from the age of 15, mainly by doing landscapes. What he is remembered for is his nonsense books, especially his popularization of the limerick. Along with Lewis Carroll, he is considered to be the founder of nonsense poetry. In addition to his limericks, he created longer nonsense poems. The best---and best known---is The Jumblies, in which the title characters go to sea in a sieve; it is a brilliant, profound, silly, and sad expression of the need to leave the security of the known world and experience the wonder and danger of the unknown. His other most notable work is The Owl and the Pussy Cat, a less complex poem whose title characters also go to sea. Lear produced humorous alphabets and botany books as well. His wordplay, involving puns, neologisms, portmanteau words, and anticlimax, retains its vitality today and has influenced such contemporary writers of children's nonsense verse as Shel Silverstein, Ogden Nash, and Laura Richards
 
Published September 1, 1994 by Stemmer House Publishers. 74 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for How Pleasant to Know Mr. Lear

Kirkus Reviews

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An aptly titled introduction, with all the obvious major nonsense poems, a ""judicious jubilant"" sampling of others, a goodly number of limericks, Lear's own drawings, and Livingston's biographical remarks--directed to older readers than the ones who might pick up the separate picture-book versi...

Dec 15 1982 | Read Full Review of How Pleasant to Know Mr. Lear...

Publishers Weekly

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Butenko, a Polish artist, disappoints with these eccentric, haphazard renderings of four poems by Lear. Butenko draws in grainy white medium on a dark, matte ground, givng the effect of chalk on a bla

Aug 29 1994 | Read Full Review of How Pleasant to Know Mr. Lear...

Publishers Weekly

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Butenko, a Polish artist, disappoints with these eccentric, haphazard renderings of four poems by Lear.

| Read Full Review of How Pleasant to Know Mr. Lear...

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