How to Cross a Pond by Marilyn Singer
Poems About Water

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Synopsis

From “Water Music” and the “Babbling Brook” (it speaks in Brookish) to an ocean that “sometimes sings and sometimes raves,” Marilyn Singer has captured the nature of water in this insightful and lyrical collection of poems. Whether she is showing us gardens, all dressed-up in “diamond necklaces of dew or lace collars of frost,” or the “sudden summer stream . . . the stubby hydrant brings to the city child,” she shows us surprising and delightful new ways of looking at water and nature.
 

About Marilyn Singer

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Meilo So’s watery india-ink illustrations, printed in blue, strike just the right balance. Marilyn Singer and Meilo So collaborated on a previous collection of poetry entitled Footprints on the Roof which School Library Journal praised as “a work of minimalist art, in which harmony is achieved between text and image with no extraneous words or strokes. A welcome addition to nature-poetry collections.”
 
Published August 12, 2003 by Knopf Books for Young Readers. 48 pages
Genres: Nature & Wildlife, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

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And at its most breathtaking, it imagines the sadness of the “dry moon / tugging at the earth’s oceans / as if she could draw them up / to fill her vast dusty seas.” So’s illustrations are appropriately enough rendered in washy blue ink, her naturally liquid style finding its apotheosis here.

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Publishers Weekly

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Popular characters and subjects return in companion volumes and new series installments. Marilyn Singer and Meilo So team up again in How to Cross a Pond: Poems About Water, a companion to Footprin

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Publishers Weekly

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Singer's evocative verses conjure a watery world, as in these lines from ""What Water Can Be"": ""A furrow that's filling/ Water, collective/ Your face in the puddle/ Water, reflective/ A network of rivers/ Water, connective."" So's watercolors flow across the pages in washes of blue.

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