I, Too, Am America by Langston Hughes

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Synopsis

Winner of the Coretta Scott King illustrator award, I, Too, Am America blends the poetic wisdom of Langston Hughes with visionary illustrations from Bryan Collier in this inspirational picture book that carries the promise of equality.


I, too, sing America.
I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong.


Langston Hughes was a courageous voice of his time, and his authentic call for equality still rings true today. Beautiful paintings from Barack Obama illustrator Bryan Collier accompany and reinvent the celebrated lines of the poem "I, Too," creating a breathtaking reminder to all Americans that we are united despite our differences.

This picture book of Langston Hughes’s celebrated poem, "I, Too, Am America," is also a Common Core Text Exemplar for Poetry.
 

About Langston Hughes

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Bryan Collier is the author and illustrator of the Coretta Scott King Award-winning book Uptown. He has also illustrated Martin’s Big Words, which was also a Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor book; Rosa, which received the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award; Dave the Potter, for which he won the Caldecott Honor; Your Moon, My Moon; and the #1 New York Times bestselling Barack Obama. Mr. Collier lives in New York.
 
Published May 22, 2012 by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers. 40 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for I, Too, Am America

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A brilliant visual association between Hughes’ poem and the history of the Pullman porters illuminates a chapter of American history but gets bogged down in backmatter explaining its metaphors.

Apr 01 2012 | Read Full Review of I, Too, Am America

Publishers Weekly

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Caldecott Honor artist Collier (Dave the Potter) uses Hughes’s well-known poem as text for a visual history of Pullman railway porters, one of the first jobs that offered African-American men steady p

Mar 02 2012 | Read Full Review of I, Too, Am America

Publishers Weekly

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Caldecott Honor artist Collier (Dave the Potter) uses Hughes’s well-known poem as text for a visual history of Pullman railway porters, one of the first jobs that offered African-American men steady pay, dignity, and a ladder into the middle class.

Mar 05 2012 | Read Full Review of I, Too, Am America

Kirkus Reviews

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It also has a universal meaning, as everyone has the desire to be seen and should be recognized as well.” When asked about Langston Hughes’ influence on Collier, he says, “When I moved to Harlem and I read [Hughes’] The Big Sea, it's as if I could feel his presence there.” The same could be sai...

Jul 04 2012 | Read Full Review of I, Too, Am America

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