I'll Sell You a Dog by Juan Pablo Villalobos

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He takes on Mexican history, literary theory, and the just-scraping-by lives of the 99 percent, all while telling a damn good story.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

Long before he was the taco seller whose ‘Gringo Dog’ recipe made him famous throughout Mexico City, our hero was an aspiring artist: an artist, that is, till his would-be girlfriend was stolen by Diego Rivera, and his dreams snuffed out by his hypochondriac mother. Now our hero is resident in a retirement home, where fending off boredom is far more grueling than making tacos. Plagued by the literary salon that bumps about his building’s lobby and haunted by the self-pitying ghost of a neglected artist, Villalobos’s old man can’t help but misbehave: he antagonises his neighbors, tortures American missionaries with passages from Adorno, and flirts with the revolutionary greengrocer. A delicious take-down of pretensions to cultural posterity, I’ll Sell You a Dog is a comic novel whose absurd inventions, scurrilous antics and oddball characters are vintage Villalobos.
 

About Juan Pablo Villalobos

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Juan Pablo Villalobos was born in Guadalajara, Mexico, in 1973, and lives in Brazil, where he writes for various publications and teaches courses in Spanish literature. He has written literary criticism, film criticism, and short stories. Villalobos is the author of Down the Rabbit Hole (FSG, 2012), which has been translated into fifteen languages.
 
Published August 4, 2016 by And Other Stories. 256 pages
Genres: Humor & Entertainment, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Critic reviews for I'll Sell You a Dog
All: 2 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 0

Kirkus

Excellent
on May 30 2016

He takes on Mexican history, literary theory, and the just-scraping-by lives of the 99 percent, all while telling a damn good story.

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Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Alberto Manguel on Oct 29 2016

The narrative of events is the same in both, but the story we were reading as a factual account of Teo’s life becomes the imagined novel Teo has refused up to now to write. For the sake of Francesca, who has magically transformed herself from an object of desire into Teo’s muse, I’ll Sell You a Dog comes gloriously into being.

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