In Extremis by Tim Parks

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Parks’ prose is laconic and skilful: the past interweaves with the present in the narrator’s mind in a supple dramatisation of consciousness. Some readers will object to the novel for not mounting significant criticism on the selfish vision of its narrator.
-Financial Times

Synopsis

In Extremis is one of the most implacable, but also one of the funniest, novels about death and family you will ever read.

Thomas knows there is something he needs to say to his mother before she dies. But will he reach her in time? And will he have the courage to say what he couldn’t say before? His phone is buzzing, his mind is racing, and he can’t concentrate on the significance of what is happening. Should he try to solve his friend’s family crisis? Should he reconsider his separation from his wife? Why does he feel so utterly confused and paralysed?

In his most exhilarating book to date, Tim Parks explores how profoundly our present identity is rooted in our family past. Can we ever really change?

 

About Tim Parks

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Published June 27, 2017 by Harvill Secker. 352 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense. Fiction
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Critic reviews for In Extremis
All: 3 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 1

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Anthony Cummins on Apr 09 2017

Less might have been more, though, with the narrator’s neuroses very nearly proving as exhausting as they are engaging.

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Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Kirsty Gunn on Apr 08 2017

Because the risks taken In Extremis are exhilarating. This is a wonderfully written novel that draws us close to Thomas in spite of who he is, not, as a lesser author would have had it, because of how he’s been carefully curated to be.

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Financial Times

Above average
Reviewed by Luke Brown on Mar 24 2017

Parks’ prose is laconic and skilful: the past interweaves with the present in the narrator’s mind in a supple dramatisation of consciousness. Some readers will object to the novel for not mounting significant criticism on the selfish vision of its narrator.

Read Full Review of In Extremis | See more reviews from Financial Times