In the Tennessee Country by Peter Taylor
A Novel

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Synopsis

This novel, by Pulitzer Prize winner Peter Taylor, tells the story of a Tenessee-bred man's obsession to recover a vanished uncle and to understand the nature of his disappearance, in a narrative that explores the crossroads in life and the paths we choose.
 

About Peter Taylor

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Peter Taylor was the author of eight story collections and three novels, including A Summons to Memphis, for which he won the Pulitzer Prize. He died in 1994.
 
Published September 1, 1994 by Chatto & Windus. 232 pages
Genres: History, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for In the Tennessee Country

Kirkus Reviews

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Throughout his life, Nat sees the mysterious Aubrey at family funerals and can only guess at what his cousin's life has become outside of the tight, although widespread, Taylor clan.

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Publishers Weekly

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Pulitzer Prize-winner Taylor tells a story of memory and family bonds in the South, spanning much of the century.

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Publishers Weekly

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He tells of a distant cousin, the illegitimate Aubrey Tucker Bradshaw, who had once briefly courted his mother and then disappeared (as did many ill-fitting men of that time and place), only to reappear mysteriously from time to time at family funerals.

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Los Angeles Times

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Even though Longfort meets Bradshaw on only a few brief occasions--most notably on the funeral train bringing the senator's body home from Washington, D.C., to Knoxville in 1916--he becomes obsessed with "Cousin Aubrey" as a kind of shadow self.

Oct 03 1994 | Read Full Review of In the Tennessee Country: A N...

The Independent

As is suitable in a story that treats time as though it could be an afternoon or an aeon, since all we can measure it in is our own generations, it is not until the future, in the form of Nathan's son Brax, that we - or Nathan - understand the importance of Cousin Aubrey in bringing hope.

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London Review of Books

3 · 9 February 1995 From Kevin Laffan It was not a spirited young lady who ‘sighed for a canter after cattle’, as John Bayley asserts in his review of Peter Taylor’s novel (LRB, 12 January), but a young man who had lost his lady love in a cattle stampede.

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Spirituality & Practice

Reviews Philosophy About Our Affiliates Books & Audios Recently Reviewed Nathan Longfort, the narrator of this story, is a middle-aged art professor.

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