Incognito by David Eagleman

87%

15 Critic Reviews

A book that will leave you looking at yourself—and the world—differently.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

If the conscious mind—the part you consider to be you—is just the tip of the iceberg, what is the rest doing?
 
In this sparkling and provocative new book, the renowned neuroscientist David Eagleman navigates the depths of the subconscious brain to illuminate surprising mysteries: Why can your foot move halfway to the brake pedal before you become consciously aware of danger ahead? Why do you hear your name being mentioned in a conversation that you didn’t think you were listening to? What do Ulysses and the credit crunch have in common? Why did Thomas Edison electrocute an elephant in 1916? Why are people whose names begin with J more likely to marry other people whose names begin with J? Why is it so difficult to keep a secret? And how is it possible to get angry at yourself—who, exactly, is mad at whom?
 
Taking in brain damage, plane spotting, dating, drugs, beauty, infidelity, synesthesia, criminal law, artificial intelligence, and visual illusions, Incognito is a thrilling subsurface exploration of the mind and all its contradictions.




From the Hardcover edition.
 

About David Eagleman

See more books from this Author
DAVID EAGLEMAN grew up in New Mexico. As an undergraduate he majored in British and American Literature before earning his PhD in Neuroscience. He heads the Laboratory for Perception and Action at Baylor College of Medicine, and is founder and director of the Initiative on Neuroscience and Law. At night he writes fiction.
 
Published May 31, 2011 by Vintage. 305 pages
Genres: Health, Fitness & Dieting, Nature & Wildlife, Professional & Technical, Science & Math, Law & Philosophy, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction
Bestseller Status:
icon16
Peak Rank on Jun 19 2011
icon8
Weeks as Bestseller
Bookmark Counts:
3
Want to Read
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for Incognito
All: 15 | Positive: 13 | Negative: 2

Kirkus

Excellent
Apr 15 2011

A book that will leave you looking at yourself—and the world—differently.

Read Full Review of Incognito | See more reviews from Kirkus

Guardian

Below average
Reviewed by Alexander Linklater on Apr 23 2011

There isn't even that much actual neuroscience in Incognito. Its illustrations are drawn just as much from the annals of evolutionary psychology, behavioural economics and more traditional forms of psychology.

Read Full Review of Incognito | See more reviews from Guardian

Blog Critics

Excellent
Reviewed by Joseph Maresca on Sep 29 2012

Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain is an important work on the intricacies of how the brain operates in making choices to regulate and monitor our behavior.

Read Full Review of Incognito | See more reviews from Blog Critics

Blog Critics

Excellent
Reviewed by Nancy Fontaine on Aug 27 2012

Eagleman is an interesting guy whose work thought-provoking to read and listen to, and his book should be required reading for all brain owners.

Read Full Review of Incognito | See more reviews from Blog Critics

Globe and Mail

Excellent
Reviewed by JEFFREY FOSS on Jun 24 2011

I love the book precisely because it reveals so many of the strings and levers of human nature.

Read Full Review of Incognito | See more reviews from Globe and Mail

The Independent

Excellent
Reviewed by Laurence Phelan on Apr 17 2011

It's a book about the things it is impossible to think about, and others that it is no longer possible not to.

Read Full Review of Incognito

Boston.com

Excellent
Reviewed by Josh Rothman on Jun 01 2011

Eagleman, by imagining the future so vividly, puts into relief just how challenging neuroscience is, and will be.

Read Full Review of Incognito

Chron.com

Excellent
Reviewed by Maggie Galehouse on May 29 2011

...my take-away from the book is Eagleman’s infectious optimism. The tiny role of consciousness isn’t something to fret about, he says. It shows the richness and complexity of our circuitry.

Read Full Review of Incognito

Cleveland.com

Excellent
Reviewed by Vikas Turakhia on May 04 2012

There's no nodding off during this Baylor University professor's prose.

Read Full Review of Incognito

The Millions

Excellent
Reviewed by Tim Requarth on May 31 2011

there is indeed beauty and comfort in knowing that we contain the unknowable.

Read Full Review of Incognito

Science News

Excellent
Reviewed by Laura Sanders on Jul 01 2011

The book’s pithy observations, breezy language and wow-inducing anecdotes provide temporary pleasure, but the book’s real strength is in its staying power.

Read Full Review of Incognito

Spectrum Culture

Excellent
Reviewed by Jordan Ardanaz on Aug 06 2011

...Incognito is the perfect introduction for the uninitiated to the utterly fascinating, and often extremely humbling, world of neurobiology.

Read Full Review of Incognito

Frontier Psychiatrist

Good
Reviewed by Keith Meatto on Jun 30 2011

In clear prose, Eagleman condenses complex concepts and reinforces his points through analogies, pop culture, current events, optical illusions, anecdotes, and fun facts.

Read Full Review of Incognito

Mind Like Child

Below average
Reviewed by Damon O'Hanlon on Jul 27 2012

Ambitious, succinct and hastily presented – like a team of rivals, it is itself a bit disjointed.

Read Full Review of Incognito

Houston Public Library

Good
Reviewed by Sarah Borders on Jun 14 2011

Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain is an utterly fascinating and straightforward read that could have only been written by a Possibilian.

Read Full Review of Incognito

Reader Rating for Incognito
76%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 710 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review

Reader reviews & activity

Ashantus Weaver

Ashantus Weaver 31 Oct 2015

Added the book to want to read list

Kaheti:iosta Jacobs

Kaheti:iosta Jacobs 5 Sep 2013

Added the book to want to read list

creekdawg

creekdawg 5 Sep 2013

Added the book to want to read list

×