Inherent Vice by Thomas Pynchon

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So, take it to beach, if you like, and spend an ­afternoon reading it. “Inherent Vice” will do as well, I suppose, as any of a half-dozen other volumes on the summer fiction best-seller list. But isn’t that a sad, ­diminished way to describe a Thomas Pynchon novel?
-WSJ online

Synopsis

A Best Book of the Year for the Chicago Tribune, Washington Post, San Francisco Chronicle, and Los Angeles Times

Part noir, part psychedelic romp, all Thomas Pynchon—private eye Doc Sportello surfaces, occasionally, out of a marijuana haze to watch the end of an era.

It’s been awhile since Doc Sportello has seen his ex-girlfriend. Suddenly out of nowhere she shows up with a story about a plot to kidnap a billionaire land developer whom she just happens to be in love with. It’s the tail end of the psychedelic sixties in L.A., and Doc knows that “love” is another one of those words going around at the moment, like “trip” or “groovy,” except this one usually leads to trouble.

In this lively yarn, Thomas Pynchon, working in an unaccustomed genre, provides a classic illustration of the principle that if you can remember the sixties, you weren’t there . . . or . . . if you were there, then you . . . or, wait, is it . . .    
 
 

About Thomas Pynchon

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Thomas Pynchon is the author of V., The Crying of Lot 49, Gravity’s Rainbow, Slow Learner, a collection of short stories, Vineland, Mason and Dixon, and, most recently, Against the Day. He received the National Book Award for Gravity’s Rainbow in 1974.
 
Published June 13, 2012 by Penguin Press. 381 pages
Genres: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Inherent Vice
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WSJ online

Above average
Reviewed by Joseph Bottum on Aug 07 2009

So, take it to beach, if you like, and spend an ­afternoon reading it. “Inherent Vice” will do as well, I suppose, as any of a half-dozen other volumes on the summer fiction best-seller list. But isn’t that a sad, ­diminished way to describe a Thomas Pynchon novel?

Read Full Review of Inherent Vice | See more reviews from WSJ online

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