Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

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I personally loved the book, and recommend it to serious readers. As you read the book you experience how life was for an African American in the pr civil right movement. Throughout the book you learn many metaphors that cause you as the reader to step back and really view the world.
-Teen Ink

Synopsis

Invisible Man is a milestone in American literature, a book that has continued to engage readers since its appearance in 1952. A first novel by an unknown writer, it remained on the bestseller list for sixteen weeks, won the National Book Award for fiction, and established Ralph Ellison as one of the key writers of the century. The nameless narrator of the novel describes growing up in a black community in the South, attending a Negro college from which he is expelled, moving to New York and becoming the chief spokesman of the Harlem branch of "the Brotherhood", and retreating amid violence and confusion to the basement lair of the Invisible Man he imagines himself to be. The book is a passionate and witty tour de force of style, strongly influenced by T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land, Joyce, and Dostoevsky.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Ralph Ellison

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Ralph Ellison was born in Okalahoma and trained as a musician at Tuskegee Institute from 1933 to 1936, at which time a visit to New York and a meeting with Richard Wright led to his first attempts at fiction. Invisible Man won the National Book Award and the Russwurm Award. Appointed to the Academy of American Arts and Letters in 1964, Ellison taught at many colleges including Bard College, the University of Chicago, and New York University where he was Albert Schweitzer Professor of Humanities from 1970 through 1980. Ralph Ellison died in 1994.
 
Published July 23, 2010 by Vintage. 610 pages
Genres: Action & Adventure, Literature & Fiction, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Education & Reference, Comics & Graphic Novels, History. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Invisible Man
All: 3 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 1

Teen Ink

Good
Reviewed by rocha26 on Jun 03 2015

I personally loved the book, and recommend it to serious readers. As you read the book you experience how life was for an African American in the pr civil right movement. Throughout the book you learn many metaphors that cause you as the reader to step back and really view the world.

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Brothers Judd

Above average
Reviewed by brothersjudd on Feb 28 2004

From it's opening scene at a Battle Royale...to it's closing scene in a Harlem riot, Ellison is always going over the top...The result is, I think, a book whose reputation outstrips it's merit.

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The Mookse and the Gripes

Good
Reviewed by Trevor Berrett on Dec 01 2008

The unnamed black narrator in Invisible Man is definitely very well educated and self-aware...Ellison is a brilliant writer, pulling out loads of cultural symbolism to deconstruct the culture. It is one of the most sophisticated and right-now important novels I’ve ever read. And it’s been right-now important, now, going on nearly sixty years.

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