Isis Mary Sophia by Rudolf Steiner
Her Mission and Ours

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Synopsis

The Rebirth of the feminine surrounds us in many forms -- from the worldwide movement for women's rights to the resurgence of interest in the feminine spirituality of the Goddess and the Divine Mother. What is the spiritual meaning of this rebirth? What is the feminine divine? Who is she?She has had many names in many cultures: Ishtar in Babylon, Inanna in Sumeria, Athena, Hera, Demeter, and Persephone in Greece, Isis in Egypt, Durga, Kali, and Lakshmi in India. She is the Shekinah of the Kabbalists and the Sophia, or Divine Wisdom of the gnostics.For Rudolf Steiner, she is Anthroposophia, the Divine Wisdom who descended from the spiritual world and passed through humanity to become now the goal and archetype of human wisdom in the cosmos.This book contains most of Rudolf Steiner's statements on Sophia. We see him, as it were, "midwifing" the birth of the Sophia, the new Isis, divine feminine wisdom, in human hearts on earth.Each chapter explores the mystery of the different relationships of Sophia: Sophia and Isis, Sophia and the Holy Spirit, Sophia and Mary, the mother of Jesus (and Mary Magdalene), Sophia and the Gnostic Achamod, and Sophia and the New Isis.Above all, in a remarkable way, Steiner makes clear the relationship of Christ and Sophia: Isis-Sophia, Divine Wisdom, slain by Lucifer, Carried off on wings of world-wide forces into cosmic space, The Christ-Will working in usWill wrest Her from LuciferAnd on vessels of spiritual knowledgeCall Isis-Sophia, Divine wisdom, to new life in human souls.
 

About Rudolf Steiner

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Austrian-born Rudolf Steiner was a noted Goethe (see Vol. 2) scholar and private student of the occult who became involved with Theosophy in Germany in 1902, when he met Annie Besant (1847--1933), a devoted follower of Madame Helena P. Blavatsky (1831--1891). In 1912 he broke with the Theosophists because of what he regarded as their oriental bias and established a system of his own, which he called Anthroposophy (anthro meaning "man"; sophia sophia meaning "wisdom"), a "spiritual science" he hoped would restore humanism to a materialistic world. In 1923 he set up headquarters for the Society of Anthroposophy in New York City. Steiner believed that human beings had evolved to the point where material existence had obscured spiritual capacities and that Christ had come to reverse that trend and to inaugurate an age of spiritual reintegration. He advocated that education, art, agriculture, and science be based on spiritual principles and infused with the psychic powers he believed were latent in everyone. The world center of the Anhthroposophical Society today is in Dornach, Switzerland, in a building designed by Steiner. The nonproselytizing society is noted for its schools.
 
Published November 1, 2003 by SteinerBooks. 257 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Political & Social Sciences, Religion & Spirituality, Gay & Lesbian, Law & Philosophy. Non-fiction
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