Italics are Mine by Nina Berberova

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Synopsis

This is the autobiography of Nina Berberova, who was born in St Petersburg in 1901, the only child of an Armenian father and a North Russian mother. After the Revolution, and the persecution of intellectuals which followed, she was forced to flee to Paris, where she was to remain for 25 years. There she formed part of a group of literary Russian emigres that included Gorky, Bunin, Svetaeva, Nabokov and Akhmatova, and earned a precarious living as a journalist, barely surviving the hardship and poverty of exile. In 1950 she left France for the United States to begin a new life with no money and no knowledge of English. She is now a retired Professor of Russian Literature at Princeton, and has belatedly been acclaimed for the short novels she wrote in the 1930s and '40s.
 

About Nina Berberova

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Published October 1, 1969 by Prentice Hall Press. 614 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

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Kirkus Reviews

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Unfortunately, but typically, this cryptic remark is not further amplified in her loosely ordered autobiography, which recounts her Russian youth, her discovery of her poetic vocation, and her years of exile in Paris and America.

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Publishers Weekly

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Her novels and stories having been rediscovered to great acclaim in the West, Russian emigre Berberova surpasses herself with this mesmerizing autobiography that evokes, with unromantic candor, the wo

Aug 02 1993 | Read Full Review of Italics are Mine

Publishers Weekly

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Her novels and stories having been rediscovered to great acclaim in the West, Russian emigre Berberova surpasses herself with this mesmerizing autobiography that evokes, with unromantic candor, the world of her fiction--Paris from the 1920s through the 40s.

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Los Angeles Times

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Autobiographical writing can be a work of love, aiming to regain the past;

Apr 23 1992 | Read Full Review of Italics are Mine

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