Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll

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Synopsis

Why shouldn't the Jabberwocky be a fourteen-fingered, slam-dunking beast?
Lewis Carroll challenged readers' imaginations with his most famous poem, "Jabberwocky". Here, Christopher Myers takes on that challenge by brilliantly re-imagining it as a face off on the basketball court. In this fresh take on the classic poem, our brave hero has mad skills, and with the help of his Vorpal 2000s, he emerges triumphant.
 

About Lewis Carroll

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Published September 4, 2007 by Jump At The Sun. 32 pages
Genres: Sports & Outdoors, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Jabberwocky

Kirkus Reviews

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The point of view advances at a walking pace through a pitch-black, woodsy landscape while a hysterically emotive narrator gasps out the verses.

Nov 02 2011 | Read Full Review of Jabberwocky

Kirkus Reviews

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The juxtaposition of familiar text against new images yields beautifully felicitous interpretations: Our hero bows his head, the foreshortened perspective putting the emphasis on his hand resting against the chain-link fence, as the text reads, “So rested he by the Tumtum tree / And stood a while...

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Publishers Weekly

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In his kinetic interpretation of Carroll's famous verse, Myers (Jazz ) gives the poem a contemporary urban setting and a basketball theme. As the book begins

Sep 17 2007 | Read Full Review of Jabberwocky

The New York Times

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Christopher Myers’s take on the greatest nonsense verse in the English-speaking world — a basketball face-off — combines brio and whimsy with more energy than a power forward.

Nov 11 2007 | Read Full Review of Jabberwocky

Publishers Weekly

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In his kinetic interpretation of Carroll's famous verse, Myers (Jazz ) gives the poem a contemporary urban setting and a basketball theme.

Sep 17 2007 | Read Full Review of Jabberwocky

Publishers Weekly

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Jorisch (Suki's Kimono ) recasts Carroll's nonsense comedy as a dystopia, setting it in a claustrophobic city among grim-faced people.

Nov 15 2004 | Read Full Review of Jabberwocky

Publishers Weekly

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The opening spread features the entire poem on one page, opposite a sepia-toned, Edward Gorey–esque portrait of a boy dancing on the arm of the chair in which his proper father sits holding a large open book on his lap.

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Publishers Weekly

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Multiple frames on several pages make the (rather feeble) scenario difficult to follow, while the fabled, fearsome beast is here only silly--with its beaky, birdish head atop a caterpillary cover, it resembles a Chinese New Year parade's dragon or a Mardi Gras costume.

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Publishers Weekly

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Graeme Base's 1989 version of Lewis Carroll's famous poem achieves new depths in Lewis Carroll's Jabberwocky: A Book of Brillig Dioramas.

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USA Today

Jorisch's new illustrations for Carroll's famed 1872 poem from Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There add a more mature, Orwellian meaning to Carroll's nonsense verse.

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Common Sense Media

Our star rating assesses the media's overall quality.Find out more Parents need to know that this poem written by Lewis Carroll is given a new twist on the basketball court, but it still hovers somewhere between silly nonsense and pure rhythmic genius.

Sep 04 2007 | Read Full Review of Jabberwocky

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