Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll

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Synopsis

The world’s best-loved nonsense poem inspires a fresh, enchantingly surreal treatment in this beautiful edition from an exciting new talent.


’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

So begins "Jabberwocky," one of the most celebrated nonsense poems in the English language. The poem first appeared in 1872 in Lewis Carroll’s classic THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS AND WHAT ALICE FOUND THERE, and since then, its mysterious and lyrical lines have delighted readers of all ages. With great wit and imagination, illustrator Joel Stewart offers a singular vision of the world of "Jabberwocky" and all its memorable creatures.
 

About Lewis Carroll

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Lewis Carroll was the pseudonym of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (1832-1898), who taught mathematics at Christ Church College, Oxford. He is the author of two classic stories of children’s literature: ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND and THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS AND WHAT ALICE FOUND THERE. These books contain many of his most popular poems, including "Jabber-wocky," "The Walrus and the Carpenter," and "You are old, father William."Joel Stewart studied at Falmouth College of Art, graduating with a degree in illustration. He is also the illustrator of THE ADVENTURES OF A NOSE by Viviane Schwarz. He says, "Carroll’s language is so rich that it’s a joy to depict just a few of the curious ideas it conjures up. As Alice herself says after reading it, ‘Somehow it fills my head with ideas - only I don’t know exactly what they are.’
 
Published May 25, 2012 by Faber and Faber. 2 pages
Genres: Children's Books, Literature & Fiction, Education & Reference, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Humor & Entertainment. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Jabberwocky

Kirkus Reviews

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The point of view advances at a walking pace through a pitch-black, woodsy landscape while a hysterically emotive narrator gasps out the verses.

Nov 02 2011 | Read Full Review of Jabberwocky

Kirkus Reviews

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The juxtaposition of familiar text against new images yields beautifully felicitous interpretations: Our hero bows his head, the foreshortened perspective putting the emphasis on his hand resting against the chain-link fence, as the text reads, “So rested he by the Tumtum tree / And stood a while...

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Publishers Weekly

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Stewart's (The Adventures of a Nose) mixed media art is as winsome, witty and wacky as Carroll's tongue-tripping poem, which first appeared in the pages o

Feb 10 2003 | Read Full Review of Jabberwocky

Publishers Weekly

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This slick version of the classic nonsense poem from Through the Looking Glass seems more a Disney souvenir than a book to snuggle up with. Angular textural sketches, apparently rough drafts for an an

Aug 31 1992 | Read Full Review of Jabberwocky

The New York Times

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Christopher Myers’s take on the greatest nonsense verse in the English-speaking world — a basketball face-off — combines brio and whimsy with more energy than a power forward.

Nov 11 2007 | Read Full Review of Jabberwocky

Publishers Weekly

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In his kinetic interpretation of Carroll's famous verse, Myers (Jazz ) gives the poem a contemporary urban setting and a basketball theme.

Sep 17 2007 | Read Full Review of Jabberwocky

Publishers Weekly

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Jorisch (Suki's Kimono ) recasts Carroll's nonsense comedy as a dystopia, setting it in a claustrophobic city among grim-faced people.

Nov 15 2004 | Read Full Review of Jabberwocky

Publishers Weekly

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The opening spread features the entire poem on one page, opposite a sepia-toned, Edward Gorey–esque portrait of a boy dancing on the arm of the chair in which his proper father sits holding a large open book on his lap.

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Publishers Weekly

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Multiple frames on several pages make the (rather feeble) scenario difficult to follow, while the fabled, fearsome beast is here only silly--with its beaky, birdish head atop a caterpillary cover, it resembles a Chinese New Year parade's dragon or a Mardi Gras costume.

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Publishers Weekly

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Graeme Base's 1989 version of Lewis Carroll's famous poem achieves new depths in Lewis Carroll's Jabberwocky: A Book of Brillig Dioramas.

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USA Today

Jorisch's new illustrations for Carroll's famed 1872 poem from Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There add a more mature, Orwellian meaning to Carroll's nonsense verse.

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Common Sense Media

Our star rating assesses the media's overall quality.Find out more Parents need to know that this poem written by Lewis Carroll is given a new twist on the basketball court, but it still hovers somewhere between silly nonsense and pure rhythmic genius.

Sep 04 2007 | Read Full Review of Jabberwocky

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