Jackie's Gift by Sharon Robinson

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Synopsis

Young Steve Satlow is thrilled when his hero Jackie Robinson moves onto his block. After the famed second baseman invites Steve to a Dodgers game, the two become friends. So when Jackie hears that the Satlows don't have a Christmas tree, he decides to give them one, not realizing the Satlows are Jewish. But Jackie's gift helps these two different families discover how much they have in common.

Written by the daughter of baseball legend Jackie Robinson and illustrated by a Caldecott Honor winner, Jackie's Gift is a holiday tale-based on a true story-about friendship and breaking barriers.

 

About Sharon Robinson

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Sharon Robinson is the author of several children's books, as well as an educational consultant for Major League Baseball and the Vice Chairman of the Jackie Robinson Foundation. She lives in Apollo Beach, Florida. E. B. Lewis has illustrated almost fifty picture books since 1993, many of them award winners. He teaches illustration at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. He lives in Folsom, New Jersey.
 
Published October 14, 2010 by Viking Juvenile. 32 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Children's Books.

Unrated Critic Reviews for Jackie's Gift

Kirkus Reviews

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Intended as an inspirational book for young people, baseball hall-of-famer Jackie Robinson’s daughter has compiled a series of brief essays and anecdotes illustrating nine values that defined her father’s approach to life: courage, determination, teamwork, persistence, integrity, citizenship, jus...

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Steve is delighted to help the Robinson family decorate their Christmas tree, and when he says that his family has no tree of their own, Jackie delivers a tree to their house, not realizing that the family is Jewish.

Oct 01 2010 | Read Full Review of Jackie's Gift

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Young Steve Satlow is a big baseball fan living in Brooklyn in the late 1940s, and he can scarcely believe his good fortune when Jackie Robinson and his family move in nearby.

Sep 17 2010 | Read Full Review of Jackie's Gift

Publishers Weekly

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Big, heavy, out there alone on the lake, testing the ice to be sure it would be safe for us.” Nelson (Henry’s Freedom Box ), a Caldecott Honor artist, contributes sumptuous, cinematic paintings that immerse readers in every scene, whether it’s an eye-to-eye meeting with Dodgers general manager Br...

Oct 05 2009 | Read Full Review of Jackie's Gift

Publishers Weekly

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As the 50th anniversary of Jackie Robinson's breaking of the baseball color line nears, he seems more of a heroic figure than ever, and this loving biography will add to his stature.

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Publishers Weekly

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In this photo biography, Robinson (Jackie's Nine: Jackie Robinson's Values to Live By ) offers an affectionate profile of her father who, she writes, "taught me to flip pancakes, hit a baseball, question political leaders, solve problems, and keep promises."

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Publishers Weekly

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Robinson pays tribute to the values that she believes exemplified her father's life in this collection of pieces, the majority of which have been published in earlier books.

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Publishers Weekly

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Robinson pays tribute to the values that she believes exemplified her father's life in this rather choppy collection of pieces, the majority of which have been published in earlier books.

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