James Joyce by James Joyce
The Dead

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Synopsis

Often cited as the best work of short fiction ever written, "The Dead" is the final short story in the 1914 collection Dubliners by James Joyce. Rightfully considered a short story masterpiece, "The Dead" tells the tale of a man (Gabriel) who, at a party hosted by his aunts in Dublin in the early part of the 20th century, has a moment of self-realization and spiritual awakening when his wife tells him about a relationship she had as a young girl with a youth who loved her passionately. James Joyce's elegant story details the New Year's Eve gathering as so evocative and beautiful that it prompted Gabriel's wife to make a shocking revelation to her husband, closing the story with an emotionally powerful epiphany that is unsurpassed in modern literature. A beautifully written story by a masterful author, the ending paragraphs in "The Dead" are some of the most haunting and lyrical in all of literature.
 

About James Joyce

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James Joyce was born on February 2, 1882, in Dublin, Ireland, into a large Catholic family. Joyce was a very good pupil, studying poetics, languages, and philosophy at Clongowes Wood College, Belvedere College, and the Royal University in Dublin. Joyce taught school in Dalkey, Ireland, before marrying in 1904. Joyce lived in Zurich and Triest, teaching languages at Berlitz schools, and then settled in Paris in 1920 where he figured prominently in the Parisian literary scene, as witnessed by Ernest Hemingway's A Moveable Feast. Joyce's collection of fine short stories, Dubliners, was published in 1914, to critical acclaim. Joyce's major works include A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses, Finnegans Wake, and Stephen Hero. Ulysses, published in 1922, is considered one of the greatest English novels of the 20th century. The book simply chronicles one day in the fictional life of Leopold Bloom, but it introduces stream of consciousness as a literary method and broaches many subjects controversial to its day. As avant-garde as Ulysses was, Finnegans Wake is even more challenging to the reader as an important modernist work. Joyce died just two years after its publication, in 1941.
 
Published May 17, 2011 by Melville House. 54 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Biographies & Memoirs, Education & Reference, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Action & Adventure. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for James Joyce

The Guardian

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James Joyce by Ian Pindar 192pp, Haus, £12.99.

Jun 11 2004 | Read Full Review of James Joyce: The Dead

The Guardian

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Book of the Week (Radio 4) is James Joyce: a Biography.

Jun 13 2011 | Read Full Review of James Joyce: The Dead

BC Books

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Others who are sacrificed on the alter of Joyce’s art include his brother Stanislaus, and his children, and although there’s little mention of young Giorgio, Lucia’s madness and Joyce’s influence on it, and the pain of it on him and on his work, are both chronicled.

Jun 01 2012 | Read Full Review of James Joyce: The Dead

BC Books

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Her Joyce isn’t the same Joyce as Ellmann’s Joyce, or Gilbert’s Joyce, or the Joyce presented by Stanislaus, his brother—though O’Brien acknowledges her debt to those biographies.

Jun 01 2012 | Read Full Review of James Joyce: The Dead

Seven Ponds

Death, as a presence, a universal reckoning, and a literary device, is a constant throughout the stories, but most notably and famously in the final story, “The Dead,” a masterpiece of the form and widely considered one of the best short stories ever written.

Nov 23 2012 | Read Full Review of James Joyce: The Dead

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