Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
The Graphic Novel (Classic Graphic Novel Collections)

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 1 Critic Review

While my review may make it sound terrible, Bronte’s plot is so good it’s still readable, and if you have a young person or English language learner struggling with the full text, this might help them follow along. That’s the best I can say for it.
-All About Romance

Synopsis

Jane Eyre is a plain, determined and intelligent child. Orphaned and poor, she is adopted by her Aunt and Uncle Reed. The death of Uncle Reed allows her unpleasant aunt to send her away to a grim charity school, where she continues her harsh upbringing, but is given the education that finally frees her. Once old enough, she becomes a teacher and takes the role of governess in a large manor house, where she falls in love with her employer. But Rochester is hiding a secret that, when revealed, forces Jane to choose between following her head and her heart. Both critically acclaimed and immensely popular, Jane Eyre dealt with concepts of class discrimination, morality, equality for women, and freedom of choice. Designed to encourage readers to enjoy classical literature, Jane Eyre The Graphic Novel stays true to Brontë's original vision. The book includes 125 pages of story artwork (by the legendary comic book artist, John M. Burns) and fascinating support material detailing the life of Charlotte Brontë.
 

About Charlotte Bronte

See more books from this Author
Charlotte Bronte, the third of six children, was born April 21, 1816, to the Reverend Patrick Bronte and Maria Branwell Bronte in Yorkshire, England. Along with her sisters, Emily and Anne, she produced some of the most impressive writings of the 19th century. The Brontes lived in a time when women used pseudonyms to conceal their female identity, hence Bronte's pseudonym, Currer Bell. Charlotte Bronte was only five when her mother died of cancer. In 1824, she and three of her sisters attended the Clergy Daughter's School in Cowan Bridge. The inspiration for the Lowood School in the classic Jane Eyre was formed by Bronte's experiences at the Clergy Daughter's School. Her two older sisters died of consumption because of the malnutrition and harsh treatment they suffered at the school. Charlotte and Emily Bronte returned home after the tragedy. The Bronte sisters fueled each other's creativity throughout their lives. As young children, they wrote long stories together about a complex imaginary kingdom they created from a set of wooden soldiers. In 1846, Charlotte Bronte, with her sisters Emily and Anne published a thin volume titled Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell. In the same year, Charlotte Bronte attempted to publish her novel, The Professor, but was rejected. One year later, she published Jane Eyre, which was instantly well received. Charlotte Bronte's life was touched by tragedy many times. Despite several proposals of marriage, she did not accept an offer until 1854 when she married the Reverend A. B. Nicholls. One year later, at the age of 39, she died of pneumonia while she was pregnant. Her previously rejected novel, The Professor, was published posthumously in 1857. Amy Corzine grew up in Texas. She paid her first visit to Ireland thirty years ago to study its folklore after discovering that it was the source of many of the fairytales she loved as a child. She subsequently studied theatre in London where she now works as a writer and editor. She also updated the fifth edition of Cadogan's Ireland guide. Joe Sutliff Sanders is assistant professor at Kansas State UJoe Sutliff Sanders is assistant professor at Kansas State University. niversity.
 
Published January 6, 2009 by Classical Comics. 144 pages
Genres: History, Romance, Young Adult, Literature & Fiction, Comics & Graphic Novels, Children's Books. Fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for Jane Eyre
All: 1 | Positive: 0 | Negative: 1

All About Romance

Below average
Reviewed by Caroline Russomanno on Aug 14 2014

While my review may make it sound terrible, Bronte’s plot is so good it’s still readable, and if you have a young person or English language learner struggling with the full text, this might help them follow along. That’s the best I can say for it.

Read Full Review of Jane Eyre: The Graphic Novel ... | See more reviews from All About Romance

Reader Rating for Jane Eyre
70%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 20 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review