Jess by Jess
O! Tricky Cad and Other oterica

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Synopsis

The San Francisco artist Jess (1923-2004) has for decades been known to cognoscenti as an inventive and sophisticated master of the collage aesthetic. Recently however, his works are receiving fresh attention from a younger generation attuned to Jess' interests in myth, narrative and appropriation. Jess used images taken from sources ranging from Dick Tracy to Dürer, from a Beatles bubblegum card to medical textbook drawings, from 1887 Scientific American line engravings to frames from George Herriman's Krazy Kat. In reexamining myth through a synthesis of art and literature, Jess' work remains a crucial assemblage of the meanings of our time. This volume brings to light collages, collage books, word poems and altered comics that have been largely inaccessible or unavailable since their making. Originally published in small editions and hard-to-find journals, or made as one-off artist's books, these works demonstrate the full range of Jess's extraordinary verbal and visual play. Several of Jess's surreal comic-strip manipulations, Tricky Cad (1954-1959), are reproduced for the first time in their entirety, as are others such as Ben Big Bolt and Nance that have never before been published. The book also includes a group of complex wraparound book covers, several unpublished collage poems, and two artist's books never before reproduced in full: From Force of Habit, a "fantastic tale" which plays with the pages of a Swedish cult sci-fi novel, and When a Young Lad Dreams of Manhood, a homoerotic paean (and naughty parody) of the priapic urge. A facsimile reproduction of the 20-page collage masterpiece O! is included as a separate booklet, and the book sports a dustjacket that folds out into a poster-size collage.
 

About Jess

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Michael works in the financial industry and he is a frequent guest speaker on merger & acquisition industry trends, and a regular lecturer of continuing legal education courses to corporate law firms. He has written articles on shareowner services and on stock options in The Journal of Employee Ownership Law and Finance. Graduating Villanova University in 1988, he lives in the NYC area with his family. He serves as an officer in The Knights of Columbus and member of the local Tea Party.
 
Published October 31, 2012 by Siglio. 192 pages
Genres: History, Arts & Photography, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Jess

Kirkus Reviews

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Notching his first felony at 15, Marty Hagen, the quintessential New York City street kid, has a rap sheet to be reckoned with by the time he’s 36.

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The New York Times

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If you read “My Name Is Will,” a lusty, pun-drunk first novel by the professional wiseacre and award-winning cartoon producer Jess Winfield (who had a hand in the above-mentioned entertainments), you will indubitably find out.

Jul 27 2008 | Read Full Review of Jess: O! Tricky Cad and Other...

The New York Times

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And he lets Matt suddenly see his life differently, “as if I’ve traded in my own vacuum tube eyes for a pair of high-def LCDs,” so Matt can take stock of the damage he has done to his family life.

Sep 16 2009 | Read Full Review of Jess: O! Tricky Cad and Other...

The New York Times

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In a typically mordant moment from “The Zero,” a novel with the temerity to give a disaster site a casual nickname, a boy named Edgar Remy tries to explain why he is mourning his lost father.

Sep 11 2006 | Read Full Review of Jess: O! Tricky Cad and Other...

The New York Times

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“Beautiful Ruins” is his Hollywood novel, his Italian novel and his Pacific Northwestern novel all braided into one: an epic romance, tragicomic, invented and reported (Walter knows his “Cleopatra” trivia), magical yet hard-boiled (think García Márquez meets Peter Biskind), with chapters that enc...

Jul 06 2012 | Read Full Review of Jess: O! Tricky Cad and Other...

Entertainment Weekly

Every summer, the beach-read conundrum begins — whether to slog virtuously through Anna Karenina or Infinite Jest, or succumb to the kind of Fifty Shades of Tattooed Twilight genre pulp that practically shrieks to passersby, ''Why, yes, I did buy this on layover at the Miami-Dade airport!'' Bles...

Jun 13 2012 | Read Full Review of Jess: O! Tricky Cad and Other...

The Washington Post

SKIPPY DIES By Paul Murray Faber & Faber.

Aug 31 2010 | Read Full Review of Jess: O! Tricky Cad and Other...

Los Angeles Review of Books

July 17th, 2012 reset - + IT COULD BE SAID that golden-age Hollywood comedies tended toward plots where “good things happen to good people.” It could also be said that for a long time now in American and English comedic literature, an inverse formula has applied: “bad things...

Jul 17 2012 | Read Full Review of Jess: O! Tricky Cad and Other...

Persephone Magazine

If she were still in the market for signs, this would be a good one: her career-challenged, strip-clubbing lunk of a boyfriend has just gotten up — at twenty minutes to noon — and texted her this one-work unpunctuated question: milk.

Aug 10 2012 | Read Full Review of Jess: O! Tricky Cad and Other...

Willamette Week

(Dee names the boy Pat, after Pasquale, and he leads a semi-successful career as a Portland rocker, whose shows even garner mention in “the Willamette Weekly.”) Beautiful Ruins is alternately poignant and laugh-out-loud funny as Walter demonstrates a dynamic range and a flawless ear for the...

Jun 27 2012 | Read Full Review of Jess: O! Tricky Cad and Other...

The Kenyon Review

I listen to music as I write and my playlist swings from old funk and R&B (William DeVaughn and the Delfonics), Bowie, Dylan, Steely Dan, lots of lyric-heavy alt-stuff (Beck, Jeff Tweedy, Richmond Fontaine, John Wesley Harding) … But mostly, honestly, I’m influenced by boring old writers;

Jul 16 2012 | Read Full Review of Jess: O! Tricky Cad and Other...

Boston Review

“When we speak of reality, we are usually referring to a cluster of assumptions,” Doniger writes: We do not have a set of precise definitions of reality in our heads—indeed, we usually do not bother to define reality at all—but we somehow assume .

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