Jinnah, Pakistan and Islamic Identity by Akbar Ahmed
The Search for Saladin

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See Reader Rating

Synopsis

Every generation needs to reinterpret its great men of the past. Akbar Ahmed, by revealing Jinnah's human face alongside his heroic achievement, both makes this statesman accessible to the current age and renders his greatness even clearer than before.


Four men shaped the end of British rule in India: Nehru, Gandhi, Mountbatten and Jinnah. We know a great deal about the first three, but Mohammed Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan, has mostly either been ignored or, in the case of Richard Attenborough's hugely successful film about Gandhi, portrayed as a cold megalomaniac, bent on the bloody partition of India. Akbar Ahmed's major study redresses the balance.


Drawing on history, semiotics and cultural anthropology as well as more conventional biographical techniques, Akbar S. Ahmad presents a rounded picture of the man and shows his relevance as contemporary Islam debates alternative forms of political leadership in a world dominated (at least in the Western media) by figures like Colonel Gadaffi and Saddam Hussein.

 

About Akbar Ahmed

See more books from this Author
Akbar Ahmed is the Ibn Khaldun Chair of Islamic Studies at American University in Washington, D.C. He was the former Pakistani high commissioner to the United Kingdom, the first Distinguished Chair of Middle East Studies at the U.S. Naval Academy, and is a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. Among his previous books are Journey into Islam and Journey into America, both published by Brookings. He is also a published poet and playwright.
 
Published August 12, 2005 by Routledge. 304 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Political & Social Sciences, Travel, Religion & Spirituality. Non-fiction

Reader Rating for Jinnah, Pakistan and Islamic Identity
62%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 36 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×