Join the Club by Tina Rosenberg
How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World

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Synopsis

In the style of The Tipping Point or Freakonomics, a groundbreaking book that will change the way you look at the world.


The fearless Tina Rosenberg has spent her career tackling some of the world's hardest problems. The Haunted Land, her searing work on how Eastern Europe faced the crimes of Communism, garnered both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. In Join the Club, she identifies a brewing social revolution that is changing the way people live, based on harnessing the positive force of peer pressure. Her stories of peer power in action show how it has reduced teen smoking in the United States, made villages in India healthier and more prosperous, helped minority students get top grades in college calculus, and even led to the fall of Slobodan Milosevic. She tells how creative social entrepreneurs are starting to use peer pressure to accomplish goals as personal as losing weight and as global as fighting terrorism. Inspiring and engrossing, Join the Club explains how we can better our world through humanity's most powerful and abundant resource: our connections with one another.
 

About Tina Rosenberg

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Rosenberg is the author of Children of Cain: Violence and the Violent in Latin America and The Haunted Land, which won the Pulitzer Prize and The National Book Award.
 
Published March 28, 2011 by W. W. Norton & Company. 432 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences, Parenting & Relationships, Business & Economics, Health, Fitness & Dieting, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Join the Club

Kirkus Reviews

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A solid, sweeping examination of peer pressure as a force for social change.

Mar 14 2011 | Read Full Review of Join the Club: How Peer Press...

The New York Times

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A journalist argues that social networks can mitigate social ills.

May 20 2011 | Read Full Review of Join the Club: How Peer Press...

The New York Times

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A journalist argues that social networks can mitigate social ills.

May 20 2011 | Read Full Review of Join the Club: How Peer Press...

The Guardian

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As Rosenberg explains, people overwhelmingly start smoking in their teens, and telling teenagers that the habit is going to kill them only makes it seem cooler.

Sep 01 2011 | Read Full Review of Join the Club: How Peer Press...

The Bookbag

Very possibly, but it’s refreshing to read a book which is looking to the future and which contains so many examples of positive things going on.

Aug 21 2011 | Read Full Review of Join the Club: How Peer Press...

Denver Post

When Tina Rosenberg told people she was writing a book on peer pressure, they assumed the worst.

Mar 30 2011 | Read Full Review of Join the Club: How Peer Press...

We Love This Book

From problems as serious as AIDS, alcoholism and recidivism to loneliness and weight loss, groups can solve the problems created by the decline in community that the modern age has brought, and can be used to change both personal and political behaviour.

Apr 08 2011 | Read Full Review of Join the Club: How Peer Press...

Spirituality & Practice

Here are some examples of the social cure: • Young men in South Africa using condoms • Teenagers in America rejecting cigarettes because it's not cool • Worshippers at a suburban megachurch animated to create community • Black and Hispanic students inspired to do well in college math ...

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New York Magazine

Kathryn Schulz on ‘Join the Club: How Peer Pressure Can Transform the World’ by Tina Rosenberg -- New York Magazine Book Review nymag.com The Magazine The Magazine Daily Intelligencer Vulture The Cut Grub Street ...

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New York Magazine

But I also detect the insidious influence of the Big Idea books, whose grand theories of humanity often wind up simplifying, ignoring, discounting, or occluding many of life’s complexities, including human individuality.

Mar 28 2011 | Read Full Review of Join the Club: How Peer Press...

New York Magazine

(And, full disclosure, I wrote a book that fits some of the above criteria.) What troubles me about the Big Idea Book Club is the way ideas often slide toward ideologies—grand unifying theories of culture, cognition, happiness, talent, the Internet, the future, you name it.

Mar 20 2011 | Read Full Review of Join the Club: How Peer Press...

Stanford Social Innovation Review

Most books about history are about power.

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Reader Rating for Join the Club
82%

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