King by Kevin J. High
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Synopsis

What would you do if you were King of America? Everybody yells at the TV during election season, but if you really had four years to fix things, what problems would you even start with?

How about a royal amendment setting the pay of congressmen at 3.5 times the average income of the district they represent, so that their success is dependent on the degree to which America is flourishing? What alterations would you make to the war on drugs? Which government agencies would you scrap and why? How would you root out corruption in government and keep it out after your four years?

Kevin High yells at the news too. After a distinguished and highly successful career in business, he's applied a lifetime spent developing a rare financial expertise to the problems facing America. His book, King, is an outside look at politics filled with simple solutions that will ruffle feathers on both sides of the aisle before uniting readers under the banner of common interest. King is a fact-heavy, plainly written book that will resonate with political newcomers and experts alike, who will all wonder why we hadn't thought of these answers before.

REVIEWS:

“America needs a king – or benevolent dictator - who can get things done. More importantly, we need people to read books like this and understand the mess we are in. I am so pleased that Kevin has taken the time to develop these ideas and spell them out in this book, and I’m proud of his efforts to help the country I love so dearly!”
-- Robert E. “Teddy” Turner IV
 

About Kevin J. High

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His grandfather owned a grocery store and his father owned a restaurant and a printing company, which means that Kevin High was born into business (he kept their floors nice and clean for many years). This knowledge of small business made Kevin an unusually young talent in the field.By the age of 18, Kevin already owned his own court-reporting business and was a notary public in Maryland, DC and Virginia. As a college student, at only 20 years-old, Kevin started a successful advertising business which held contracts with both Kentucky Fried Chicken and the Marines. At 22, Kevin left to become a stock broker. It wasn't long before he was a top producer with Shearson Lehman Hutton (which would later become Smith Barney). From that point forward, Kevin's star in the business world just got brighter. He would go on to carve out a twenty year career of acquiring and selling companies that stands as a monument to his ability to fix businesses. In the wake of 9/11, having personally lost much to the attacks, it was decided that Kevin and his family would take an extended sailing trip, which they did for almost three years. But even at sea, Kevin couldn't stop his mind from returning to his passion of business. Near the end of 2002 he had discovered a company called Solomon Technology. Kevin agreed to help the company raise capital and and to take it public. From the comfort of his boat, Kevin managed to raise the company several million dollars.After three years, Kevin reentered the business world rejuvenated. In his time at sea, Kevin fell in love with the city of Charleston. It was there that he founded Sequence Investment Partners. It wasn't long before the company entered into an agreement with Webster Rodgers, becoming WRSequence. After selling his equity share in the company, Kevin now lives a much quieter life managing his investments and working as a hightly-sought-after consultant.But his new life has left him salivating at the chance to fix one more business - the ultimate business. After a lifetime developing a savant-like skill in his craft, Kevin is ready for the challenge this financial giant presents. That one final business is, of course, the United States government.Which is why, ever since 2010, Kevin J. High has been writing this book.When not running a business or contemplating politics, Kevin is an avid sailor and photographer. He has a son and daughter who both make him very proud.
 
Published October 3, 2012 by CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform. 256 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences.

Unrated Critic Reviews for King

The New York Times

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While in her scenes with Quentin she sometimes feels like a retread of Alice, a magician of unearthly power who provided much of the juice in “The Magicians,” in her own story she’s a character of real grit and fierce intelligence.

Aug 26 2011 | Read Full Review of King: Times like these requir...

The New York Times

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It seems to me there are two ways of understanding the document assembled from a jumble of boxes, disks and printed or handwritten papers that, at the time of David Foster Wallace’s suicide in 2008, ran into the high hundreds of pages — a document that, conscientiously and intelligently whittled ...

Apr 14 2011 | Read Full Review of King: Times like these requir...

The New York Times

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When the local storekeeper and huckster decides that Dome Day’s famine-inducing possibilities can help him unload a lot of old hot dogs, someone at the hospital is told to “expect an influx of gastroenteritis patients this evening.” All of this — along with the smog that starts to choke off Ches...

Nov 11 2009 | Read Full Review of King: Times like these requir...

The New York Times

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Mr. King generates suspense just following the way Edgar struggles with his memory.

Jan 21 2008 | Read Full Review of King: Times like these requir...

The New York Times

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Each act of cruelty or violence is somehow associated — harmonized, King would suggest — with every other act.

Nov 10 2011 | Read Full Review of King: Times like these requir...

The New York Times

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“In a disembodied voice, as though reading from a script, she gave him instructions the way a kidnapper would give instructions: how much money she wanted — 250 now, monthly, because of the kid — the date each month she wanted it, the post-office box in Portland where he had to send it, what woul...

Nov 23 2011 | Read Full Review of King: Times like these requir...

USA Today

In a time when a gallon of gas costs 19 cents, Jake buys a '54 Ford Sunliner convertible, tunes to the Everly Brothers, and heads south toward Dallas, facing detours all the way.But Jake's target never detours from Oswald.In the story's rush to the climactic ending, Jake frantically limps against...

Nov 17 2011 | Read Full Review of King: Times like these requir...

The Columbus Dispatch

NEW YORK — Michael Jackson was the type of entertainer who oversaw all the details of his shows, from the slick choreography to the rhinestones and pearls sewn onto his elaborate costumes, his longtime costume designer said.

Oct 18 2012 | Read Full Review of King: Times like these requir...

Business Week

By the time King Larry reaches the protracted, thickety probate part of its narrative—and there emerges an illegitimate-child claimant to the Hillblom estate with the tragicomically pidgin-ish name of Junior Larry Hillbroom—Scurlock’s rollicking ride is over.

Jan 12 2012 | Read Full Review of King: Times like these requir...

Time Magazine

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11/22/63 isn’t your typical King outing: it’s a time-travel novel about a guy who finds a portal back to 1958 and uses it to try to prevent the assassination of President Kennedy.

Nov 02 2011 | Read Full Review of King: Times like these requir...

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