Kingdom of Fear by Hunter S. Thompson
Loathsome Secrets of a Star-Crossed Child in the Final Days of the American Century

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 2 Critic Reviews

Another reason for the déjà vu experience on offer is that much of what appears here has already been printed elsewhere...Pages of profiles and news stories about the outlaw god make a generous contribution to filling out the book's 350 pages...The talent displayed here is no longer Gonzo. On this evidence, it's just plain gone.
-Guardian

Synopsis

The Gonzo memoir from one of the most influential voices in American literature, Kingdom of Fear traces the course of Hunter S. Thompson’s life as a rebel—from a smart-mouthed Kentucky kid flaunting all authority to a convention-defying journalist who came to personify a wild fusion of fact, fiction, and mind-altering substances.

Brilliant, provocative, outrageous, and brazen, Hunter S. Thompson's infamous rule breaking—in his journalism, in his life, and under the law—changed the shape of American letters, and the face of American icons.

Call it the evolution of an outlaw. Here are the formative experiences that comprise Thompson’s legendary trajectory alongside the weird and the ugly. Whether detailing his exploits as a foreign correspondent in Rio, his job as night manager of the notorious O’Farrell Theatre in San Francisco, his epic run for sheriff of Aspen on the Freak Power ticket, or the sensational legal maneuvering that led to his full acquittal in the famous 99 Days trial, Thompson is at the peak of his narrative powers in Kingdom of Fear. And this boisterous, blistering ride illuminates as never before the professional and ideological risk taking of a literary genius and transgressive icon.
 

About Hunter S. Thompson

See more books from this Author
Hunter S. Thompson was born and raised in Louisville, Kentucky. His books include Hell's Angels", Fear and Loathing at Rolling Stone", Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72", The Rum Diary", and Better than Sex". He died in February 2005. Douglas Brinkley is a professor of history at Rice University and a contributing editor to Vanity Fair. His most recent books are The Quiet World, The Wilderness Warrior, and The Great Deluge. Six of his books have been selected as New York Times Notable Books of the Year. He lives in Texas.
 
Published September 20, 2011 by Simon & Schuster. 384 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Business & Economics, History, Education & Reference, Political & Social Sciences, Humor & Entertainment. Non-fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for Kingdom of Fear
All: 2 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 1

Guardian

Below average
Reviewed by Andrew Anthony on Jun 22 2003

Another reason for the déjà vu experience on offer is that much of what appears here has already been printed elsewhere...Pages of profiles and news stories about the outlaw god make a generous contribution to filling out the book's 350 pages...The talent displayed here is no longer Gonzo. On this evidence, it's just plain gone.

Read Full Review of Kingdom of Fear : Loathsome S... | See more reviews from Guardian

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Paul Theroux on May 17 2003

Kingdom of Fear combines memoir, polemic, satire, abuse, diablerie, and something new for Hunter Thompson - a nice line in prophecy...Kingdom of Fear is angry, prophetic, full of vitality and enormously funny. In almost 40 years of battling the Confederacy of Dunces, Thompson's energy has not flagged.

Read Full Review of Kingdom of Fear : Loathsome S... | See more reviews from Guardian

Reader Rating for Kingdom of Fear
79%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 136 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×