La La Folie Baudelaire by Roberto Calasso

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That conceit is characteristic Sainte-Beuve – brilliant and insolent, inventive and exact, not to say exacting. It is also characteristic Calasso, whose extravagant admiration and connective intuition makes a book of equal brilliance
-Guardian

Synopsis

In La Folie Baudelaire, Roberto Calasso―one of the most original and acclaimed writers on literature, art, culture, and mythology―turns his attention to the poets and writers of Paris in the nineteenth century who created what was later called "the Modern." His protagonist is Charles Baudelaire: poet of "nerves," art love, pioneering critic, man about Paris. Calasso ranges through Baudelaire's life and work, focusing on two painters―Ingres and Delacroix―about whom Baudelaire wrote acutely, and then turns to Degas and Manet, who followed in the tracks Baudelaire laid down in his great essay The Painter of Modern Life. In Calasso's lavishly illustrated mosaic of stories, insights, close readings of poems, and commentaries on paintings, Baudelaire's Paris comes brilliantly to life.

In the eighteenth century, a Folie was a garden pavilion set aside for people of leisure, a place of delight and fantasy. Following Baudelaire, Calasso has created a brilliant and dramatic "Folie Baudelaire"―a place where the reader can encounter the poet himself, his peers, his city, and his extraordinary likes and dislikes, finally discovering that that places is situated in the middle of the land of "absolute literature."

 

About Roberto Calasso

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Born in Florence, Roberto Calasso lives in Milan, where he is publisher of Adelphi. He is the author of Tiepolo Pink, The Ruin of Kasch, The Marriage of Cadmus and Harmony, winner of the Prix Veillon and the Prix du Meilleur Livre Etranger, Literature and the Gods, Ka and K.
 
Published January 1, 2012 by Allen Lane. 352 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Literature & Fiction, History. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for La La Folie Baudelaire
All: 4 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 2

NY Times

Above average
Reviewed by John Simon on Nov 16 2012

Roberto Calasso is noted for being an intellectually challenging writer.

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Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Lucian Robinson on Jan 13 2013

The book's title plays on the dual definitions of "la folie", a word denoting both madness and a type of 18th-century rural pavilion. Madness is certainly present in this meandering genealogy of modernity but there is method too.

Read Full Review of La La Folie Baudelaire | See more reviews from Guardian

Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Alex Danchev on Dec 28 2012

That conceit is characteristic Sainte-Beuve – brilliant and insolent, inventive and exact, not to say exacting. It is also characteristic Calasso, whose extravagant admiration and connective intuition makes a book of equal brilliance

Read Full Review of La La Folie Baudelaire | See more reviews from Guardian

LA Times

Above average
Reviewed by Thomas McGonigle on Dec 06 2012

A questioning assault upon the received wisdom, it exposes the hollow triumph of Impressionism and its artists, Renoir, Manet, Monet and Degas, over an implacable academy.

Read Full Review of La La Folie Baudelaire | See more reviews from LA Times

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