Labyrinths by Catrine Clay
Emma Jung, Her Marriage to Carl, and the Early Years of Psychoanalysis

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Too long overlooked, Emma’s legacy mimicked her life – Labyrinths is the first mainstream publication to recognise both the value of her contributions as a practitioner of analytical psychology, but more importantly to acknowledge the integral role she played in the discipline’s development.
-Guardian

Synopsis

 A sensational, eye-opening account of Emma Jung’s complex marriage to Carl Gustav Jung and the hitherto unknown role she played in the early years of the psychoanalytic movement.

Clever and ambitious, Emma Jung yearned to study the natural sciences at the University of Zurich. But the strict rules of proper Swiss society at the beginning of the twentieth century dictated that a woman of Emma’s stature—one of the richest heiresses in Switzerland—travel to Paris to "finish" her education, to prepare for marriage to a suitable man.

Engaged to the son of one of her father’s wealthy business colleagues, Emma’s conventional and predictable life was upended when she met Carl Jung. The son of a penniless pastor working as an assistant physician in an insane asylum, Jung dazzled Emma with his intelligence, confidence, and good looks. More important, he offered her freedom from the confines of a traditional haute-bourgeois life. But Emma did not know that Jung’s charisma masked a dark interior—fostered by a strange, isolated childhood and the sexual abuse he’d suffered as a boy—as well as a compulsive philandering that would threaten their marriage.

Using letters, family interviews, and rich, never-before-published archival material, Catrine Clay illuminates the Jungs’ unorthodox marriage and explores how it shaped—and was shaped by—the scandalous new movement of psychoanalysis. Most important, Clay reveals how Carl Jung could never have achieved what he did without Emma supporting him through his private torments. The Emma that emerges in the pages of Labyrinths is a strong, brilliant woman, who, with her husband’s encouragement, becomes a successful analyst in her own right.

 

About Catrine Clay

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Catrine Clay has worked for the BBC for more than twenty years, directing and producing award-winning television documentaries. King, Kaiser, Tsar is her third book, resulting from her documentary of the same title. She is married and lives in London with her three children.
 
Published November 8, 2016 by Harper. 416 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Health, Fitness & Dieting, History, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for Labyrinths
All: 4 | Positive: 3 | Negative: 1

Kirkus

Above average
on Aug 21 2016

A sensitive biography of a woman whose emotional and intellectual strengths were the ballast of her marriage and family.

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NY Times

Below average
Reviewed by Jennifer Senior on Nov 06 2016

The subject is rich, definitely, and Jungian analysis has a groovy, woo-woo sort of appeal. But Ms. Clay’s sourcing is thin. She devotes pages of filler to the glorious architecture of Middle Europe — sounding uncomfortably close to the sales pitch for a Viking River Cruise...

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Financial Times

Good
Reviewed by Antonia Macaro on Aug 19 2016

Labyrinths, Catrine Clay’s absorbing new biography, charts the twists and turns in some of the key lives involved in that historical moment, in particular those of Emma Jung and her more famous husband, Carl.

Read Full Review of Labyrinths: Emma Jung, Her Ma... | See more reviews from Financial Times

Guardian

Good
Reviewed by LUCY SCHOLES on Aug 07 2016

Too long overlooked, Emma’s legacy mimicked her life – Labyrinths is the first mainstream publication to recognise both the value of her contributions as a practitioner of analytical psychology, but more importantly to acknowledge the integral role she played in the discipline’s development.

Read Full Review of Labyrinths: Emma Jung, Her Ma... | See more reviews from Guardian

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