Last Flesh by Christopher Dewdney
Life in the Transhuman Era

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Synopsis

Never before has human life been able to change itself, to reach into its own genetic structure and rearrange its molecular basis -- now it can. We are about to enter the transitional period between the human and posthuman eras -- the transhuman age. In Last Flesh, poet, philosopher and media critic Christopher Dewdney takes a personal look at this transitional era -- its culture, media and technology. | The goal of transhumanism is to surpass our human limitations, and already this new era is being heralded by an unprecedented expansion of human capabilities. Genetic engineering, artificial intelligence and neuroscience are about to give humans the keys to their own destiny. Voice-recognition, as well as computer-assisted literature and art, will provide a new cultural richness. Nano-technology, robotics and physics will produce astounding new advances in engineering. Last Flesh explores the impact, both social and moral, of these innovations. | Sweeping broadly across our present-day media landscape -- from the Internet to body piercing, from televisions to prostheses, from plastic surgery to cryonics -- Last Flesh recasts the present in the shifting and eerie light of the deep future. A thoughtful and accessible interpretation of our changing species by one of our most original thinkers, Last Flesh is brilliant and provocative.
 

About Christopher Dewdney

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Christopher Dewdeny was born May 9, 1951. He has been nominated for the Governor General's Award three times, twice for poetry, once for non-fiction. Dewdney currently teaches creative writing at Calumet College at York University and serves as an Academic Advisor. He has won first prize in the CBC Literary Competition for poetry and is currently a contributing media panelist on TVOntario's Studio 2.
 
Published February 1, 1998 by Harpercollins Canada. 284 pages
Genres: . Non-fiction