Lawrence Booth's Book of Visions by Mr. Maurice Manning
(Yale Series of Younger Poets)

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Synopsis

This year's winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets competition is Maurice Manning's Lawrence Booth's Book of Visions. These compelling poems take us on a wild ride through the life of a man-child in the rural South. Presenting a cast of allegorical, yet very real, characters, the poems have "authority, daring, and a language of colour and sure movement", says series judge W.S. Merwin. Maurice Manning is a native of Danville, Kentucky. He holds degrees from Earlham College, the University of Kentucky, and the University of Alabama, where he received his MFA in 1999. He has held a writing fellowship to The Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. He currently teaches English at DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana. From Seven Chimeras The way Booth makes a love story: same as a regular story, except under one rock is a trapdoor that leads to a room full of belly buttons; each must be pushed, one is a landmine. The way Booth makes hope: thirty-seven acres, Black Damon, Red Dog. Construct a pillar of fire in the Great Field and let it become unquenchable. The way Booth ends the Jack-in-the-Box charade: shoot the weasel in the neck and toss it to the buzzards.
The way Booth thinks of salvation: God holding a broken abacus, coloured beads falling away.
 

About Mr. Maurice Manning

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Manning holds degrees from Earlham College, the University of Kentucky, and the University of Alabama, where he recieved his MFA in 1999. He currently teaches English at DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana.
 
Published July 11, 2001 by Yale University Press. 96 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Lawrence Booth's Book of Visions

The New York Times

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These are poems in which offhandedly shrewd images (''The night-time smells / like creosote and shirtless boys, mixed with june bugs and grease'') mingle with confusing and disturbing ones: in one poem, Lawrence's violent father -- who is referred to, variously, as ''Ole Dreadful Daddy,'' ''Ninet...

Aug 19 2001 | Read Full Review of Lawrence Booth's Book of Visi...

Publishers Weekly

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Lawrence Booth is a vigorous, trash-talking, frustrating and entirely made-up young man from a rural South that's equal parts carnivorous nightmare, Freudian pastoral and deep-fried family romance.

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